Pool Permit Issued by the City of Monte Sereno and Full Drilling Process

Swimming Pool Permit in Hand!

The City of Monte Sereno issued the permit to complete the swimming pool today.

It was 24 hours since we submitted the application for the pool permit.

Yippee!

Full Drilling Process

One cannot appreciate the complexity and coordination required to drill 30 ft deep holes with the last 10 feet of that drilling in water.  The photos below illustrate the process.

First, the hole is drilled to the full depth (30 ft in our case), with the 20 inch casing in the hole as it is being drilled.

One drilled to depth and confirmed by the soils engineer, the driller sets the bit aside and puts the 30 ft. rebar cage into the hole, inside the casing.  The structural engineer confirms the positioning of the rebar cage in the hole and gives approval to proceed.  At this point, the pumper truck operator raises the 30 ft tremie and prepares to lower it into the hole.

Tremie at the end of the concrete pumper truck boom, with the 30 ft mark in red.

Tremie at the end of the concrete pumper truck boom, with the 30 ft mark in red.

You can see the operator in the photo below, and the red mark showing the 30 ft length.  Everyone had to be careful to reach maximum depth and not get the tremie snagged on the rebar cage.

Tremie being lowered into hole (6 ft to go).

Tremie being lowered into hole (6 ft to go).

At this point, the operator calls for concrete from the mixer and starts pumping concrete into the hole.

Ready to start pumping concrete through the tremie into the hole.

Ready to start pumping concrete through the tremie into the hole.

As the concrete is poured, the operator raises the tremie, making sure that the tremie is always under the water and immersed in concrete.  The water rises above the concrete.

Raising tremie as concrete is being poured.

Raising tremie as concrete is being poured.

When the concrete has been poured to approximately 15 ft (half of the 30 ft), the operator stops pumping and removes the tremie from the hole.

Preparing to remove the tremie, and then the casing.

Preparing to remove the tremie, and then the casing.

The driller then raises the casing and removes it from the hole.

Casing being removed from the hole.

Casing being removed from the hole.

Casing coming out ...

Casing coming out ...

The casing is 20 ft long, and here it comes!

Casing being removed (note tremie in background).

Casing being removed (note tremie in background).

And over the wall it goes, safely out of the way.

Over the wall and positioned for the next hole.

Over the wall and positioned for the next hole.

The casing is gone and everyone gets back into position to lower the tremie into the hole.

Ready to put tremie into the hole (note auger bit and wet cuttings to the left of the operator).

Ready to put tremie into the hole (note auger bit and wet cuttings to the left of the operator).

With the casing removed, the pump operator then lowers the tremie back into the hole and continues pumping.

Tremie goes back into the hole.

Tremie goes back into the hole.

Again, the operator raises the tremie as the concrete is poured, ensuring the tremie is under the concrete at all times and the water rises above the concrete.

Raising the tremie as the concrete is pumped into the hole.

Raising the tremie as the concrete is pumped into the hole.

On our job site, the water would start pouring out of the hole during the last 8 to 10 ft.  It gets a bit more than messy at this point!

Water emerges as the concrete completely fills the hole.

Water emerges as the concrete completely fills the hole.

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