‘Let’s Pour Concrete’

Those were the building inspector’s exact words.

The weather forecast for tomorrow looks great (sunny and a high of 59F) so we’re looking good!

Installing the Electrical Conduit

One of the last remaining items before pouring concrete was to put electrical conduit into the structural slab.  Scott Andersen suggested that we put conduit into the structural slab to make it easier and faster to put in the electrical circuits.  Especially since we are putting in steel columns in several walls.

Mark Clausen (owner of Clausen Electric, Inc.) was on site this morning and we identified several locations where the electrical conduits should terminate.  There were two locations on the west side, and two locations on the east side.

Mark Clausen reviewing floor plans and recommending termination points for conduit in the structural slab.

Mark Clausen reviewing floor plans and recommending termination points for conduit in the structural slab.

Mark recommended that we have two electrical conduits from the West Mechanical room, one terminating in the north wall of Nik’s Bedroom and the other terminating in the wall between Nik’s Bedroom and the Guest Bedroom.  In placing the electrical conduits, it was easy to identify these exact locations since the plates for the steel columns are embedded in those walls that the electrical conduits would terminate in.

Two conduit terminations in Nik's Bedroom.

Two conduit terminations in Nik's Bedroom.

In addition, Mark recommended that we place two electrical conduits in the East Mechanical room, with one terminating by the sink/dishwasher in the Snack Area and the other terminating in the west wall of the Guest Suite.

Conduit terminating by dishwasher in the Snack Area.

Conduit terminating by the dishwasher in the Snack Area.

Conduit terminating in the west wall of the Guest Suite.

Conduit terminating in the west wall of the Guest Suite.

In addition to the electrical conduit, Scott had ‘strongly encouraged’ us to run a conduit for a data backbone.  Since we had some time and extra conduit, we placed a conduit going from the Home Automation room to the west wall of the East Mechanical room.

Data conduit terminating in west wall of East Mechanical room.

Conduit from the Home Automation Room terminating in west wall of East Mechanical room.

With these conduits in place, we had another hour or so before the inspection.  Anything else?

Well, we will need to connect the photovoltaic solar panels on the roof to the inverters in the East Mechanical room.  After a quick call to Bill Brown, who confirmed this would be appropriate, we ran a 2 inch conduit from the south corner of the garage wall to the East Mechanical room.  This conduit should be able to go up the concrete wall to the roof SIP, where the connections will be made to the photovoltaic solar panels.

From left, 2 inch conduit to photovoltaic solar panels on roof, data conduit to Home Automation room, and two 2 inch electrical conduits to the sub-panel in the West Mechanical room.

From left, 2 inch conduit to photovoltaic solar panels on roof, data conduit to the Home Automation room, and two 2 inch electrical conduits to the sub-panel in the West Mechanical room.

Electrical conduits terminating under the main panel in the East Mechanical room.

Seven electrical conduits terminating under the main panel in the East Mechanical room.

Inspecting the Reinforcing Steel

We were just gluing the final electrical conduit when the Building Official, Howard Bell, from the City of Monte Sereno arrived to inspect our reinforcing steel (rebar).

He reviewed the plans (that were approved yesterday) and then spent ~15 minutes verifying that the rebar was placed as per the plans.  Satisfied that the rebar was placed in position correctly, Howard picked up the plans and went to the test panel outside.

Taking the plans to the test panel.

Taking the plans to the test panel.

Test Panel

We discussed the shotcrete test panel and Howard explained the objectives of this test.  He outlined how the test panel should mimic the most dense reinforcing steel areas and how the same qualified individual that will be doing the shotcrete walls should use the same equipment to complete the shotcrete test panel. 

After completing the shotcrete test panel, the special inspector will take core samples of the test panel to confirm the shotcrete was to the required strength and there are no voids in the test panel.  After a successful test, we can proceed to shotcrete the foundation walls. 

With no further questions, Howard smiled and said, ‘Let’s pour concrete.’

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