Measuring for the Hollow Core Concrete Panels

We placed the steel beams and columns yesterday and needed some additional assurance that the hollow core concrete panels that are being delivered from L.A. on Monday will fit when we install them on Tuesday. 

They will fit just fine.

Sinclairs Tour the Site

Jo-Anne’s parents, John and Dode Sinclair, have been here for three weeks and are returning to Canada tomorrow.  They toured the site this morning so they can follow our blog until their next visit to California. 

Although they liked the view from the front of the property, getting to the temporary deck over the pool requires going around the house by Winchester.  We explained that, if they stayed another week, they would be able to go through the house by walking on the hollow core concrete panels.

Our steel beams are looking great.  They should be covered with hollow core concrete panels on Tuesday so this will be a very different view next Saturday.

Our steel beams are looking great. They should be covered with hollow core concrete panels on Tuesday so this will be a very different view next Saturday.

Bryan points out the features in Nik's Room to Jo-Anne's mother, Dode.

Bryan points out the features in Nik's Room to Jo-Anne's mother, Dode.

John and Dode reviewing the site from the temporary observation deck.

John and Dode reviewing the site from the temporary observation deck.

Seasonal Perched Water Table

You can see the effects of our ‘seasonal perched water table’ in the excavation at the back of the house.  This water has increased the complexity and dramatically increased the cost of our project.

Note the water line in the soil, indicating the seasonal perched water table.

Note the water line in the soil, indicating the seasonal perched water table.

Measuring With Only One Person

Bryan had a hard time measuring the distances between the beams without someone else to hold the end of the measuring tape.  Then, he thought of using a plumb bob to identify the beam positions on the concrete floor and then measuring the distances between those beam positions.

A good idea except the ladder had to be moved for each measurement.  This required a bit more thinking before Bryan used a heavy washer at the opposite end of the string for the plumb bob.  With this method, Bryan threw the washer over a beam and then used the plumb bob and measuring tape to identify the distance from the wall, etc.

This method was easy, fast and required only one person (and not ladder).

Bryan with the plumb bob and heavy washer so he can measure the distances between the beams by himself.

Bryan with the plumb bob and heavy washer so he can measure the distances between the beams by himself.

Throwing the washer over a beam to hold the plumb bob.

Throwing the washer over a beam to hold the plumb bob.

Measuring the distance to the edge of a beam with the plumb bob and measuring tape.

Measuring the distance to the edge of a beam with a plumb bob and measuring tape.

Jo-Anne Reviews the Site

Late this afternoon, Jo-Anne appeared at the site.  She had been in Boston all week and had a narrow window of time between her hair appointment and Nik’s baseball game so she came to the site. 

Jo-Anne liked the stairs that Jorge had built this week and very much appreciated not having to use the ladder. 

She came bearing gifts!

Jo-Anne comes down the exterior concrete steps for the first time, bearing gifts!

Jo-Anne walks down the exterior concrete steps for the first time, bearing gifts!

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