Ready to Ship Our SIPs

The entire roof of our house and the front wall are made from SIPs (Structural Insulated Panels) that are manufactured in Canada by Insulspan.

Dave Stevenson called us to let us know the SIPs are ready to be shipped from their plant in Delta, British Columbia.  We need to have the main floor concrete and structural framing ready to receive the SIPs.  The manufacturing of the panels is complete, so that item is off the critical path.

Now, we need to focus on concrete.

SIPs from Insulspan

We had several alternative SIP manufacturers and chose Insulspan for a number of reasons.  The team at Insulspan included Dave Stevenson, Lorne Shepert and Nancy Yao.  It was great to be working with Canadians on our project here in California.

Today, Dave had one of his colleagues, Bill Edwards, take photos of our completed SIPs.  Each panel is numbered and will be assembled at our job site.  The SIPs have chases cut for our electrical wiring, so the wiring should go in nicely. We planned for rigid conduit to go through the SIPs that will carry the DC wires from our solar panels through to the inverters in the East Mechanical Room. 

Our engineers of record, Innovative Structural Engineering, reviewed the shop drawings for the SIPs and wet-signed two copies of those shop drawings.  We will file the shop drawings with the City of Monte Sereno.

All photo credits to Bill Edwards.

Our roof SIPs, waiting patiently in Delta, BC for shipping to California.

Our roof SIPs, waiting patiently in Delta, BC for shipping to California.

Each SIP is unique and numbered so it can be assembed at our job site.  These are all roof panels and are 12¼ inches thick, resulting in an R47 roof.

Each SIP is unique and numbered so it can be assembed at our job site. These are all roof panels and are 12¼ inches thick, resulting in an R47 roof.

These are the gable roof panels.  Our roof will have a 12:12 pitch, resulting in a 90 degree angle at the top of the roof.  We will have one roof section 'overlap' the other, simplifying the roof and allowing a very airtight seam connection at the top.

These are the gable roof panels. Our roof will have a 12:12 pitch, resulting in a 90 degree angle at the top of the roof.

You can see the splines in these roof panels.  These splines are similar to an I-beam, with a thin web between the top and bottom flanges.  The thin web reduces the thermal bridging.

You can see the splines in these roof panels. These splines are similar to an I-beam, with a thin web between the top and bottom flanges. The thin web reduces the thermal bridging.

Here are our wall and pony wall SIPs.  The front wall of our house will be made from 6½ inch SIPs as will the pony walls on our flat roof.  In this stack, you can see the 45 degree angle pony walls that will support the gable roofs.

Here are our wall and pony wall SIPs. The front wall of our house will be made from 6½ inch SIPs as will the pony walls on our flat roof. In this stack, you can see the 45 degree angle pony walls that will support the gable roofs.

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