Assigning Our Reclaimed Beams to Specific Beam Locations

Reclaimed beams are unique.  Each beam has different characteristics, including the location in the tree that the beam is from, changes to date (e.g., bends and warps), and holes from fasteners (e.g., reinforcing steel) and notches.

As well, only certain parts of beams will be visible in our house.  For example, only the first 4 feet of the 12-foot beam in the garage will be visible (visible on three sides and exposed to the weather).  As well, certain beams have different structural loads, such as the drop beam in the garage that sits on the garage header (these beams carry significant structual loads).

So … we had to review the characteristics of each beam and the various requirements for beams througout the house, and then assign the individual beams to each beam location.

Back to the Santa Cruz Mountains.

Driving up Highway 1 towards the turnoff to Bonny Doon (just south of Davenport).

Driving up Highway 1 towards the turnoff to Bonny Doon (just south of Davenport).

Our beams, uncovered so they can be reviewed, evaluated and assigned to specific locations in the house.

Our beams, uncovered so they can be reviewed, evaluated and assigned to specific locations in the house.

While the beams do not look good here, once the outside wood is removed they will be spectacular.

While the beams do not look good here, once the outside wood is removed they will be spectacular.

Bryan wrote the location on the top of each beam with red pen.

Bryan wrote the location on the top of each beam with red pen.

The beam on the right is 25 ft 6 inches long, and will be cut in two so we will have two 6x6 wooden beams for the East and West drop beams supporting the upper flat roof in the atrium.

The 6x14 beam on the right is 25 ft 6 inches long, and will be cut in two so we will have two 6x6 wooden beams for the East and West drop beams supporting the upper flat roof in the atrium.

After assigning each beam to a specific location, we wrapped up the beams and tucked them in for the night.

After assigning each beam to a specific location, we wrapped up the beams and tucked them in for the night.

Bryan standing by the first lift of Madrone hardwood, which has been air drying for several months (photo credit - David Merchant).

Bryan standing by the first lift of Madrone hardwood, which has been air drying for several months (photo - David Merchant).

Bryan standing by the second lift of Madrone hardwood.  This wood will go into a kiln, where it will continue to be dried slowly (photo credit - David Merchant).

Bryan standing by the second lift of Madrone hardwood. This wood will go into a kiln, where it will continue to be dried slowly (photo - David Merchant).

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