Furring the Ceiling in the Lower Level

The final parts of the framing with wrapping up in our lower level today.  As well, we started the furring under the hollow core concrete panels.

Furring the Ceiling

We designed the basement ceiling to reuse the Redwood decking from the original house, which has been ripped in two and remilled by Jackel Enterprises in Watsonville.

The 5/8-inch Redwood tongue and groove material must be fastened to the hollow core concrete panels so we need 2×4 furring to be attached to the hollow core concrete panels.  Since the hollow core concrete panels have a slight camber, the 2×4 furring strips need to be shimmed so they are level.  We are attaching the pressure-treated furring with GRK Caliburn screws, or equivalent.

The bearing wall under the W14x43 steel beam has been strengthened by sistering in additional 2x6 studs and then adding horizontal blocking.

The bearing wall under the W14x43 steel beam has been strengthened by sistering in additional 2×6 studs and then adding horizontal blocking.

We are dropping the ceiling in the Wine Dining so we can insulate the ceiling and have this room be seen as a very different space from the rest of the lower level.

We are dropping the ceiling in the Wine Dining so we can insulate the ceiling and have this room be seen as a very different space from the rest of the lower level.

The ceiling is dropped in the West Mechanical room so we can insulate it as Kate's bedroom is above it. The West Mechanical room will house our electric pumps, which are part of our geothermal heat exchange.

The ceiling is dropped in the West Mechanical room so we can insulate it as Kate’s bedroom is above it.  The West Mechanical room will house our electric pumps, which are part of our geothermal heat exchange.

Caliburn concrete screws, from GRK.

Caliburn concrete screws, from GRK.

Titen Masonry screws, from Simpson Strong Tie.

Titen Masonry screws, from Simpson Strong Tie.

Pressure treated 2x4 furring in the Play Area. Note the cedar shims.

Pressure treated 2×4 furring in the Play Area. Note the cedar shims.

Furring and soffits in the Snack Area.

Furring and soffits in the Snack Area.

Scott Andersen’s Design in Panama

Our good friend, Scott Andersen, has been working with an architect in Panama to design a house.  As background, Scott worked with us on the conceptual design for our house and he has over 20 years of designing contempory homes in Toronto, Canada.  The rendering of the house shows plenty of concrete, glass and steel, with an infinity edge pool and spectacular views.  Definitely an ‘adult’ house.

The question is, ‘How fast can this house be built?’ with the follow on question, ‘Will the house in Panama be completed before our house in completed?’.

Rendering of a house in Panama.

Rendering of a house in Panama.

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