Working with a Crane

The heavy rains yesterday were depressing as we thought of working with a crane today.  Fortunately, we enjoyed a dry and sunny day!

We had four tasks for the crane, and we completed them all.  Our crane operator today was Jose Melendez, and he continued to show why we like working with West Coast Cranes:  He was safe, knowledgable, expeditious and fun to work with.

Tasks for the Crane

We scheduled the morning to complete the following:

  1. Unload and place the wooden beams that we ordered and received from Craftmark, Inc.
  2. Remove the temporary steel beams that were used to support the existing East and West walls, and load them on a truck.
  3. Unload and place our remaining FSC-certified lumber for our SIP roof.
  4. Stage the first 13 SIP roof panels on the west side of the house.

We had a tight schedule and everyone worked together to make it happen.  The sun was shining, and we had fun.  Yes, we got it done!

Evaluating Our Beams

The four beams that arrived yesterday from Northern Idaho were going to be placed by the crane this morning.  Thus, the first task was to review and evaluate each beam, and decide on which face would be exposed (bottom and each side).  Then, we marked the beams with blue tape so we could orient them correctly when placing them with the crane.

Two of the beams will be adjacent to each other.  One of the beams is an 8×12 that is 38 ft long and the other is a true 4.00 inch x 14.00 inch beam that is 26 ft long.  The other two beams are going in the Garage and were required to be graded as ‘Select Structural’ since we don’t want these beams to twist or warp.

All the beams were pretty.

The 4.00 x 14.00 and the 8×12 beams are spectacular.

Placing Our Four Wooden Beams

Our crane arrived and the operator, Jose, set it up as close as possible to the garage, so he could have the longest reach possible. While he was getting set up, we had the truck driver back into Via Sereno so he was ready for the crane to pick up the beams.

Once the crane was ready, we removed the two beams for the Garage at the same time from the truck and placed those over the garage, being careful to be clear of the temporary steel beam.

Jerry Ditto happened to be driving by on Winchester Boulevard and saw the crane, so he stopped to observe our progress.  Jerry has been involved with our project since inception and has been supportive and helpful throughout.  Since he was on site, we had Jerry take some photos.

After placing the two beams for the Garage, we then picked up the 8×12, oriented it correctly, and placed it between the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room and the feature concrete wall in the Garage. We will have to so some work with this beam so it is staged, ready for cutting and being placed easily over the Simpson Strong Tie GLBs.

The last beam, the 4.00 x 14.00 inch beam, was placed on top of the SIPs that we are storing in the Living Room.

The first task was completed and the truck left Via Sereno.

Removing the First Temporary Steel Beam

Since the SIPs will extend over the existing West wall, we have to remove the temporary steel beam that had been supporting the West wall. This steel beam was a double I beam, weighing 90 lbs per ft and it is 60 ft long. We had to rig this carefully so the crane could pick it up and move it very carefully to the street, where it would be resting until the truck arrived.

Given the weight and length of the beam, removing it took some time as we were extra safe and avoided the trees.

The truck arrived to take the temporary steel beams away and, while it was backing into Via Sereno and getting set up, we took the opportunity to position the first of our SIPs on the structural framing.

Unloading Our FSC-Certified Lumber from Channel Lumber

Our FSC-certified lumber arrived on a trailer so we switched gears and unloaded the lumber. Placing the lumber in the house was not easy since the longest beams and 2x12s were 26 ft long and they had to be lowered, then turned 90 degrees, then lowered into position. We took our time and had the lumber staged temporarily in the Master Suite.

Loading the Two Temporary Steel Beams on the Truck

As soon as the truck was in place on Via Sereno, we moved the first steel beam from the street to the truck. Then, we repositioned the truck while rigging the second temporary steel beam. The second steel beam came out through the front of the house and then we moved it 90 degrees and placed it on the truck.
That was the last we will see of the temporary steel beams. (Yay!)

Staging Our First SIPs on the Roof

With the first three tasks completed, we focused on staging our SIPs on the roof.  This was a milestone occasion as we had a roof back in place!

Staging the SIPs required us to ensure that the panels were placed in the correct sequence (e.g., RA1, RA2, RA3, etc.) and ensure the panels were oriented correctly.  Taking the time to stage the SIPs correctly will reduce subsequent handling and ensure the assembly progresses expeditiously.

Since we were staging SIPs on the roof, we were creating more space on the project site.  This allowed us to move some of the SIPs around to make our site more accessible.

Family Inspection

Just as Bryan was preparing to leave, Jo-Anne arrived.  She walked the property, inspecting the beams and approving of the progress today.

Then, Nik and Kate arrived.  They were most excited to see the SIPs in place.  It was much easier for Kate to understand her bedroom, now that it had a roof (temporarily in place).

Everyone was pleased with our progress

Completing the Week

Bryan is going to take a couple days ‘off’ so he can see the 2010 Olympics in Vancouver, Canada and visit a house on Bainbridge Island, within sight of Seattle, Washington.  The house on Bainbridge Island is just being completed now and should inspire us regarding finishing materials and completing our project!

Francisco and Bryan reviewed each beam and collaborated on which faces should be exposed. These decisions had to be made prior to using the crane to unload the beams and position them in the house.

Francisco and Bryan reviewed each beam and collaborated on which faces should be exposed. These decisions had to be made prior to using the crane to unload the beams and position them in the house.

All of the beams look great!

All of the beams look great!

Our truck driver backs into Via Sereno with our four wooden beams.

Our truck driver backs into Via Sereno with our four wooden beams.

The crane moves the Garage door header and the center drop beam in the Garage from the truck to the house.

The crane moves the Garage door header and the center drop beam in the Garage from the truck to the house.

Bryan rigs the 8x12 beam (photo by Jerry Ditto).

Bryan rigs the 8×12 beam (photo by Jerry Ditto).

Our 40 ft 8x12 flys through the air to the back of the house, where it will span from the Garage to the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Our 40 ft 8×12 flys through the air to the back of the house, where it will span from the Garage to the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Jerry Ditto happened to be driving by our site and saw the crane working, so he stopped to see our progress.

Jerry Ditto happened to be driving by our site and saw the crane working, so he stopped to see our progress.

The four wooden beams are off the truck. The 4.00x14.00 beam is on the left, then the 8x12 is in the center, and the two 6x10 beams are over the Garage, on the right.

The four wooden beams are off the truck. The 4.00×14.00 beam is on the left, then the 8×12 is in the center, and the two 6×10 beams are over the Garage, on the right.

The first temporary steel beam is removed, and is being moved to the street.

The first temporary steel beam is removed, and is being moved to the street.

The size of this 60 ft. steel beam is apparent when in context to the lot and vehicles street.

The size of this 60 ft. steel beam is apparent when in context to the lot and vehicles street.

Our order of FSC-certified lumber arrives on a trailer from Channel Lumber.

Our order of FSC-certified lumber arrives on a trailer from Channel Lumber.

The trailer with our FSC-certified lumber order.

The trailer with our FSC-certified lumber order.

The crane moves the FSC-certified beams from the trailer into the Master Suite.

The crane moves the FSC-certified beams from the trailer into the Master Suite.

Pete Janovich guides the first temporary steel beam as it is loaded onto the trailer.

Pete Janovich guides the first temporary steel beam as it is loaded onto the trailer.

The second steel beam is loaded onto the trailer.

The second steel beam is loaded onto the trailer.

The first structural insulated panels (SIPs) are staged on the roof.

The first structural insulated panels (SIPs) are staged on the roof.

The team from Earth Bound Homes put the Garage beams in place, only hours after the beams were delivered to the job site.

The team from Earth Bound Homes put the Garage beams in place, only hours after the beams were delivered to the job site.

Carlos covers our SIPs with a tarp so they are protected from the forecasted rain storms.

Carlos covers our SIPs with a tarp so they are protected from the forecasted rain storms.

We covered all of the SIPs on our site.

We covered all of the SIPs on our site.

The Garage header, which supports the drop beam in the center of the garage looks good.

The Garage header, which supports the drop beam in the center of the garage looks good.

To prepare for the forecasted rains, we covered everything with tarps.

To prepare for the forecasted rains, we covered everything with tarps.

Jo-Anne inspects our progress, noting that the 8x12 beam is now protected from the forecasted rains.

Jo-Anne inspects our progress, noting that the 8×12 beam is now protected from the forecasted rains.

Jo-Anne in the Master Suite, with our FSC-certified 2x12s that will be used to assemble the roof SIPs.

Jo-Anne in the Master Suite, with our FSC-certified 2x12s that will be used to assemble the roof SIPs.

Kate and Nik, standing in Kate's Bathroom (where her tub will be).

Kate and Nik, standing in Kate’s Bathroom (where her tub will be).

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