Getting into the Pool

We want to dump ‘waste heat’ into our swimming pool so the cooling system needs to be connected with our swimming pool.  In order to do so, we need to know where to locate the water supply and return.

As well, Bryan obtained the necessary connections to mount a satellite dish on the upper flat roof.  Way cool.

Dumping Waste Heat into the Swimming Pool

When we have excess heat in the house, we want to move that heat into the swimming pool.  In order to do so, we need to have a supply of water from the pool and be able to discharge that water into the pool.  Michael Benision, of MWB Pools & Spas, has been working on reshaping our pool.

Bryan consulted with Michael regarding how to integrate the house cooling system with the swimming pool.  Michael explained that the water supply should be a dedicated suction from the main pool and the discharge should go to the pool equipment pad, where he can connect it (with a check valve) to the spa supply line.  Thus, the cold water will come from the main pool and the heated water will go to the spa.  The spa and main pool are connected.

Putting a dedicated suction into the pool will be relatively easy – the critical issue is to identify the location of that dedicated suction.  On the south wall of the pool, where the suction will be ‘hidden’ from view (we want a simple, clean look to everything), there are two lights and two discharges.  We need to identify exactly where these items are so the new suction will not conflict with the lights or the discharges.

Time for Bryan to Get into the Pool

We designed the temporary pool cover so it could be opened in sections for purposes exactly like this.  The temporary pool cover is in six sections.  Four of the sections are 8 ft wide, and two of the sections are 4 ft wide (the temporary pool cover is made with 4×8 sheets of plywood).  Paul Marcaccio and Bryan built the temporary pool cover on December 7, 2008.

Bryan worked with Izzy to jack up one of the 4 ft wide sections, which was over where the steps go into the main pool.  Within 20 minutes, the section was open and Bryan got into the pool.  He could see where the high water mark was and, in general, the pool was quite clean.  There was over 20 inches of water in the bottom on the pool.

Izzy marked where the suction line will go on the South side of the pool so he could excavate a small trench to that location.

Preparing for a Satellite Dish

Although we have cable, we want to plan for placing a satellite dish on the upper flat roof.  We talked through the requirements with our home automation consultant, Brandon Smith of Brandon Smith Audio Design in Santa Cruz, and our home automation advisor, Paul Fulton.  Both Brandon and Paul believe that the best time to put in the cable and mounting system is when the house is being built.

We are going to mount a 1-5/8 inch pipe inside of a 2 inch pipe that is connected to the top layer of OSB in our upper flat SIP roof, and that pipe will extend through the SIP to another connection in the bottom layer of OSB.  The pipe will be capped until we need it and the white membrane roof will go around this penetration.

Paul Fulton recommended that we run six (6) RG-6 cables from the home automation closet in the lower level to the pipe in the upper flat roof.  Also, we will run a grounding wire so the system can be grounded safely.

Bryan needs to get the assembly mounted and the RG-6 wires run.

The pipe assembly that will support the mast for a satellite TV antenna. Note the smaller pipe socket to the left as this will go under the SIP so the mast will be supported at the top and bottom of the SIP.

The pipe assembly that will support the mast for a satellite TV antenna. Note the smaller pipe socket to the left as this will go under the SIP so the mast will be supported at the top and bottom of the SIP.

The trench at the front of the house includes the 4-inch black ABS pipe that will carry our rainwater to the underground cistern. The white PVC pipe in this photo connects to the 4-inch drain so any backwash water from a potassium water softener and/or an activated charcoal filter can be collected in our underground cistern as well.

The trench at the front of the house includes the 4-inch black ABS pipe that will carry our rainwater to the underground cistern. The white PVC pipe in this photo connects to the 4-inch drain so any backwash water from a potassium water softener and/or an activated charcoal filter can be collected in our underground cistern as well.

Bryan is inside the pool, under the temporary pool deck. Izzy helped Bryan to lift one of the 4 ft wide sections of the temporary plywood deck.

Bryan is inside the pool, under the temporary pool deck. Izzy helped Bryan to lift one of the 4 ft wide sections of the temporary plywood deck.

The new suction that will take water from the main part of the pool will be located midway between the two lights on the South side of the pool.

The new suction that will take water from the main part of the pool will be located midway between the two lights on the South side of the pool.

View under the temporary plywood deck over the pool. Note the spa on the right, by the steps.

View under the temporary plywood deck over the pool. Note the spa on the right, by the steps.

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