Reviewing the Wine Cellar Mock Up

Markus Benzenhofer, from TWA Systems, came to the job site today and reviewed the Wine Cellar.  Markus is working on the design and layout of the cooling panels in the ceiling, which will use our waste cold water to cool our wine.

Reviewing the Wine Cellar Mock Up

To design the cooling system, Markus needs to understand the load on the system.  The load on the cooling system is a function of many elements, including the size of the panels, the distance from the panels to other surfaces, and the temperature, volume and velocity of water going through the panels.

Importantly, Markus also reviewed how the cooling panels would be supported and where the attachments to the chilled water manifold would be.  Markus wanted to ensure that the design was robust and would support maintenance and allow access to the various components.

With the mock up of the wine racks in place, Markus reviewed the distance from the exterior walls to the panels as well as the distances from the wine racks to the panels.  He asked about attachments and described the load of the panels, which would need to be attached to the ceiling.

In order to understand the impact of the lighting, Markus and Bryan held the sample panel in place (using a ladder and measuring tape) and then tried to see what it would look like.  It was difficult to do with any precision.

After taking some notes, Markus commented, ‘A precise scale drawing would help to analyze the issues with certainly.  A mock up would be perfect.’

Markus left and Bryan set to work with Al and Nep, putting a mock up of the dropped ceiling and cooling system together.

Our 24 ft sliding glass door in the closed position. Note there are only two vertical lines resulting from the three sliding glass panels. Also, note how the vertical lines do not interrupt the 36-inch wide hardwood flooring and how the panels are different sizes.

Our 24 ft sliding glass door in the closed position. Note there are only two vertical lines resulting from the three sliding glass panels. Also, note how the vertical lines do not interrupt the 36-inch wide hardwood flooring and how the panels are different sizes.

The sliding glass panels are now behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room. A clear 24 ft span!

The sliding glass panels are now behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room. A clear 24 ft span!

Top of the pocket with the three sliding glass panels in the pocket. Bryan reviewed the design and layout of the pocket with Al.

Top of the pocket with the three sliding glass panels in the pocket. Bryan reviewed the design and layout of the pocket with Al.

Pocket and sliding glass doors behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Pocket and sliding glass doors behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Base of ppcket with sliding glass panels are behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Base of pocket with sliding glass panels behind the feature concrete wall in the Dining Room.

Top of pocket with sliding glass doors in the closed position. We need to have the house air tight so this position is critical.

Top of pocket with sliding glass doors in the closed position. We need to have the house air tight so this position is critical.

Same position with doors extended, and view of top. The exterior face of the sliding glass panel needs to lock into something to prevent air leakage around the exterior (third) glass panel.

Same position with doors extended, and view of top. The exterior face of the sliding glass panel needs to lock into something to prevent air leakage around the exterior (third) glass panel.

View of bottom of pocket with sliding glass panel in closed position.

View of bottom of pocket with sliding glass panel in closed position.

Tape measure in Wine Cellar, showing the components that Markus and Bryan had established in December.

Tape measure in Wine Cellar, showing the components that Markus and Bryan had established in December.

Measuring the distance to the hollow core concrete panels. The ceiling will be dropped so we can insulate the Wine Cellar. As well, the cooling panels will be attached to the dropped ceiling structure.

Measuring the distance to the hollow core concrete panels. The ceiling will be dropped so we can insulate the Wine Cellar. As well, the cooling panels will be attached to the dropped ceiling structure.

After Markus left, Bryan worked with Al and Nep to put a fast mock up of the ceiling structure with cooling panels in place.

After Markus left, Bryan worked with Al and Nep to put a fast mock up of the ceiling structure with cooling panels in place.

Angle of viewing from Wine Dining where the top of the panel is not visible.

Angle of viewing from Wine Dining where the top of the panel is not visible.

View of mock up, showing the dropped ceiling and panel height.

View of mock up, showing the dropped ceiling and panel height.

View of front of ceiling, with actual distance from panel to soffit. The Redwood in the bottom and side of soffit are mocked up with scrap material so we could see the angles. Note the attachment to the dropped ceiling is not mocked up correctly although the height of the panel is correct.

View of front of ceiling, with actual distance from panel to soffit. The Redwood in the bottom and side of soffit are mocked up with scrap material so we could see the angles. Note the attachment to the dropped ceiling is not mocked up correctly although the height of the panel is correct.

View of mock up from inside the North aisle in the Wine Cellar.

View of mock up from inside the North aisle in the Wine Cellar.

View of dropped ceiling and attachment to sleepers secured to the bottom of the hollow core concrete panels.

View of dropped ceiling and attachment to sleepers secured to the bottom of the hollow core concrete panels.  This space will be filled with closed cell spray foam.

View of cooling panel under dropped ceiling. Note the attachment to the panels is not in the correct location.

View of cooling panel under dropped ceiling. Note the attachment to the panels is not in the correct location.

View of soffit with mocked up Redwood in place. Note the spacing for the top of the North rack.

View of soffit with mocked up Redwood in place. Note the spacing for the top of the North rack.

Another view of the soffit, showing the details of the various components (layers).

Another view of the soffit, showing the details of the various components (layers).

Reclaimed Redwood that Al and Nep have cut for the racks in the Wine Cellar. This wood is old growth, clear heart Redwood. Al deconstructed a deck in a previous project and saved the wood to be used in the future. It will look spectacular in our Wine Cellar!

Reclaimed Redwood that Al and Nep have cut for the racks in the Wine Cellar. This wood is old growth, clear heart Redwood. Al deconstructed a deck in a previous project and saved the wood to be used in the future. It will look spectacular in our Wine Cellar!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *