Archive for the ‘LEED’ Category

Starting on Our Rainscreen Over the Radiant Barrier

Monday, September 26th, 2011

With the approval of our building wrap by the City of Monte Sereno on Friday afternoon, we started on building the rainscreen over the radiant barrier on the West side of the house today.  Dan Shurter joined the team today and will certainly increase our capacity and accelerate our progress.

Addressing the Issues Relating to Our Solar Rebate

Our rebate under the NHSP expires on September 29, 2011, which is only days away.  On Friday, September 16, 2011, the Building Official at the City of Monte Sereno, Howard Bell, noted that the installation is complete but he would not approve the permit.  Since then, we have been working with the City of Monte Sereno and Pacific Gas & Electric Company to search for ways to connect our solar photovoltaic system to the grid through our temporary electric service but have not been successful.

Bryan met with Brian Loventhal, City Manager, today and Brian requested that we submit a document outlining the situation we are facing, the alternatives, and a proposed solution.  Brian noted that he cannot address the issues relating to our project based on conversations.

So, Bryan focused on documenting the issues relating to our solar rebate and a recommended solution.  He will deliver two copies to the City of Monte Sereno on Tuesday morning.

Starting on Our Rainscreen over the Radiant Barrier

We noticed that the siding on our house was damaged by water and sunlight, and needed maintenance.  To address this, we decided to extend the roof overhang as much as possible and to use a ‘rainscreen’ to reduce damage caused by moisture.  In addition, we included a radiant barrier to reduce the cooling load in the house.

While researching radiant barriers, we learned that a radiant barrier is not effective without a 3/4 inch air gap over the radiant barrier.  This ‘fit’ well with a rain screen design as the back of the siding needs to be exposed to air.  We found a product, Cor-A-Vent, that could go at the top and bottom of the wall that would allow air, but not insects, to flow through the air space.

For siding, we worked with Robert Spaulding (Roseburg Forest Products) and Chris Tritschler (Channel Lumber) to specify and source FSC siding that would be the closest match to the original siding that Eichler used.  Note that the original siding is still on the structure, it is under the Tyvek building wrap and the radiant barrier.  As well, Chris provided the FSC furring strips for the rainscreen.

Front view of the rainscreen design. Air enters at the bottom and flows out the top. Furring strips every 16 inches on center.

Detail of bottom of rainscreen, showing how air enters through the Cor-A-Vent.

Top of rainscreen, showing how air exits.

FSC siding from Roseburg Forest Products.

Roseburg Forest Products' chain-of-custody number is stamped on each sheet of siding.

FSC furring strips, primed and ready ...

Radiant barrier at front of house.

Furring strips on 16-inch centers on West side of house.

Fresh air intake (bottom) and exhaust air (top) that supply air to, and exhaust air from, the house. These air flows go through our heat recovery unit in the Air Handler room.

Detail at top of wall, showing wooden beams above windows.

The first sheet of primed FSC siding is in place.

 

Installing Our Sequoia Central Vacuum

Wednesday, September 14th, 2011

Bryan had picked up the Sequoia Vacuum SV-700 unit today and positioned it in the garage.

Initially, we didn’t think that a central vacuum was important. The more we started the learn about the value of indoor air quality, the more we understood the importance of a central vacuum with an external exhaust.

Then, of course, we dug into the cyclonic vs. filter system and determined that we wanted to keep the outside of our house clean.

While evaluating central vacuum systems, we found that the leader in central vacuum systems is Sequoia Vacuum Systems, which is located in Menlo Park, just the other side of Palo Alto.  Earlier, we had worked on installing the collection pipes for the central vacuum system.

IAQ 8.2 Indoor Contaminant Control (1 point each, maximum 2 points).
Select from the following measures:
a) Design and install permanent walk-off mats at each entry that are at least 4 feet in length and allow accessibility for cleaning (e.g., grating with catch basin).
b) Design a shoe removal and storage space near the primary entryway, separated from living areas. This space may not have wall-to-wall carpeting, and it must be large enough to accommodate a bench and at least two pairs of shoes per bedroom.
c) Install a central vacuum system with exhaust to the outdoors. Ensure that the exhaust is not near any ventilation air intake.

Sequoia Vacuum System's SV-700 unit installed in our garage.

Reviewing Progress on Our Red Front Door

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2011

It was a full day today.

Al continued working on the roof, trying to stay in front of the forecasted rains for tomorrow (100% probability).  Bryan met with the City of Monte Sereno to review our preliminary lighting control plans, John Rider dropped by to see how the project is developing, Bryan and John met with Nathan Merrill to review the progress on our red front door, and Shane Lothrop provided instructions on how we could make an opening in one of our shear walls.

And our daughter, Kate, was on the winning team for her first AA baseball game with Los Gatos Little League (Kate plays hardball).

Reviewing Progress on Our Red Front Door

During John Rider’s quick walk-through of our project, Nathan Merrill called Bryan and asked if he could move the scheduled time of 2:00 pm forward to noon for Bryan to to review the progress Nathan was making on our red front door.  With John having to go back to his office, it was perfect!  John followed Bryan in his truck to Nathan’s shop on Dell Avenue.

John Rider has worked on our project since July 2008.  John is a LEED-accredited professional and is now accredited under the LEED for Homes program.  John dropped by to say that he wants to complete the preliminary rating review on our project and finalize the plans so we can proceed.  Darrel Kelly, our Green-rater under the LEED for homes program has been encouraging us to schedule another integrated project meeting to complete our preliminary rating.  John is with Jrider + Design.

Bryan introduced John to Nathan Merrill, of American Ornamental Iron and then Nathan took us into his shop.  Nathan had our door hanging from his shop forklift, so he could work on it. 

Nathan explained that he is planning to have the door powder coated and asked Bryan to sign off on the colors for the frame and the door.  Nathan has the original red front door in his shop and will take it to the powder coating firm so they can match the color.

John was impressed with the Valli & Valli hardware and Nathan showed John the details where he will not only be meeting the specifications and finish by Valli & Valli but exceeding them.  For example, Nathan is ensuring that all the edges of the door have the same rounding radius (.0625 inch) and that the stainless steel recessed machine bolts are brushed as per the Valli & Valli finish.  Detail is key …

Making an Opening in Our Shear Wall

The recent earthquake and resulting tsumani in Japan shocked us and underscored the importance of exceeding the local seismic requirements.  Since our objective is to live in this house for the next 15 years, we don’t want to meet code requirements – we must exceed those requirements.  We believe strongly that the San Francisco Bay Area will experience a 7.5 or greater earthquake in the next 15 years.

For our lighting control panels, Bryan reviewed locations in the house and then met with our Building Official at the City of Monte Sereno, Howard Bell, this morning to discuss our proposed locations.  Howard reviewed the alternatives with Bryan and recommended that we make an opening in our shear wall in the upper laundry room to do so.  If we go with that location then Howard requires us to review the opening with our Structural Engineer of Record, Shane Lothrop of Innovative Structural Engineering.

Shane reviewed the proposed location and then sent Bryan written instructions on where and how to make the opening.  Those instructions included requirements on the opening so it will maintain the structural integrity of the shear wall.

John Rider (right) and Nathan Merrill discuss our red front door (hanging from the forks of the forklift).

Nathan Merrill (left) and John Rider discuss our red front door (hanging from the forks of the forklift).

The door, including sidelights.  Nathan is fabricating the components around the door.  Note that the piece at the bottom of the door is a brace that will be removed before it is installed.

The door, including sidelights. Nathan is fabricating the components around the door. Note that the piece at the bottom of the door is a brace that will be removed before it is installed.

The door opens in, using four Soss hinges (invisible hinges).  Nathan explained that the door will need some cycles to get the hinges working smoothly (the door weighs 246 lbs).

The door opens in, using four Soss hinges (invisible hinges). Nathan explained that the door will need some cycles to get the hinges working smoothly (the door weighs 246 lbs).

Close up of the Valli & Valli hardware exterior hardware.

Close up of the Valli & Valli hardware exterior hardware.

Close up of the electrified mortise lockset.  The Valli & Valli logo on the inside door handle can be seen, just barely.

Close up of the electrified mortise lockset. The Valli & Valli logo on the inside door handle can be seen, just barely. Nathan's logo and the serial number will be on the top of the door.

Jig for making the wine racks.  There is a left and right jig as we will require 76 of the individual supports to be manufactured.

Jig for making the wine racks. There is a left and right jig as we will require 76 of the individual supports to be manufactured.

The other half of the jig.

The other half of the jig.

The first of some 24 vertical pieces in each of the three wine racks (left, center and right).

The first of some 24 vertical pieces in each of the three wine racks (left, center and right).

Alan holding the first component of the wine rack in the wine cellar.  Note the clearance at the top of the rack, by the ceiling where the radiant cooling will be installed.

Alan holding the first component of the wine rack in the wine cellar. Note the clearance at the top of the rack, by the ceiling where the radiant cooling will be installed.

Shear wall by Upper Laundry Room.  The framed area to the left is for one of three art niches; the stud bay to the right is where we would like the opening in the shear wall.

Shear wall by Upper Laundry Room. The framed area to the left is for one of three art niches; the stud bay to the right is where we would like the opening in the shear wall.

Shear wall from Upper Laundry Room, showing where we would like the opening for the lighting control system.

Shear wall from Upper Laundry Room, showing where we would like the opening for the lighting control system.

The electric cables for the lights in the ceiling will be run up these posts.  We will drill through each post to bring the electricity to the exterior fixtures that will light the underside of the upper flat roof.

The electric cables for the lights in the ceiling will be run up these posts. We will drill through each post to bring the electricity to the exterior fixtures that will light the underside of the upper flat roof.

In order to bring the electric circuits from the West side to the East side, we will have to drill eight holes through this beam.

In order to bring the electric circuits from the West side to the East side, we will have to drill eight holes through this beam.

 

Our daughter, Kate Mekechuk, in her first AA game catching in the second inning.  The Manager and coaching staff are by the fence, with photographers behind them.

Our daughter, Kate Mekechuk, in her first AA game catching in the second inning. The Manager and coaching staff are by the fence, with a photographer behind them.

Scrambling Before the Rains Arrive

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Bryan returned from Edmonton last night and scrambled today in order to prepare for the rains forecasted through the weekend.

While Bryan was in Edmonton, Al and Nep completed putting the Deck Armor on the gable roofs and even managed to put Grace Ultra (butyl) under the Deck Armor before re-attaching the solar mounts.  This will ensure that the roof deck is completely watertight.

Taking 160 lbs of Construction Waste to Guadalupe Land Fill

Bryan took another load of construction waste to Guadalupe land fill.  This load was packaging materials that could not be recycled.  The weight in was 5,300 lbs and the weight out was 5,140 lbs; net for this load was 160 lbs.

Our Shakes Arrived from British Columbia!

The yellow cedar shakes that we purchased from BCF Shake Mill on Vancouver Island arrived at White Cap Construction Supply today.  Bryan took a truck load of shakes to the job site today and the other two pallets will be delivered on Monday.

We plan to store shakes in the Garage and need to use an oil preserve on each shake (front and back) to increase their useful life.  Durability is important …

Before going to White Cap, Bryan stopped by Top Gun Industrial Finishing to get the final sill pan that was painted for us.  Bryan couldn’t take this large piece on Monday.  Also, he picked up more stainless steel fasteners from Lord & Sons.  These items will allow the team from Earth Bound Homes to complete our window and door installation.

Meeting with Carole Murray

Bryan showed Nathan Merrill, from American Ornamental Iron, the newly painted sill pans.  Nathan was interested in the Kynar paint.  During their discussion, Nathan reminded Bryan that the door design cannot be completed without selecting the door hardware.  The hardware includes the door handles (interior and exterior) and the lockset.  Bryan asked Nathan where we should go.  Nathan replied, ‘Carole Murray.’

We were fortunate to catch Carole in her showroom and Bryan spent 20 minutes with her outlining the design for the front door.  Carole recommended that we review the door handles and locksets made by FSB, which she distributes.

As well, Carole was adamant that the front door be as tall as possible, and not the 6 ft 8 inch height of the original door.  She believes that the front door should make a statement, and that it should not be modest.  Bryan explained that the door can only be 36 inches wide, so having an 8 ft tall door could appear to be too skinny.  Carole responded matter of factly, ‘Doors are like women.  They can’t be too tall or too skinny.’

Bryan then consulted with Nathan for his thoughts on the door height.  Nathan considered the light and other matters, and said that he would think about it over the weekend.

We mocked up the change using an image from ArchiCAD.  What do you think?

Rendering of front of house, with the door height at 6 ft 8 inches.

Rendering of front of house, with the door height at 6 ft 8 inches.

Rendering of full height door.  The door could be wider by making the net door opening to be 36 inches.  The hardwood floor, inside the house and across the bridge, will be exactly 36 inches wide.

Rendering of full height door. The door could be wider by making the net door opening to be 36 inches. The hardwood floor, inside the house and across the bridge, will be exactly 36 inches wide.

Newly painted custom sill pan, in the Master Bedroom where a casement window will be located.  Note the radiant barrier on the exterior of the house, where the rainscreen will be.

Newly painted custom sill pan, in the Master Bedroom where a casement window will be located. Note the radiant barrier on the exterior of the house, where the rainscreen will be.

On the roof, reviewing the Deck Armor that Al and Nep installed over the last two days.

On the roof, reviewing the Deck Armor that Al and Nep installed over the last two days.

Al and Nep are cutting the fiber cement boards, from Certainteed, that will be the finished surface around all of the clerestory windows.

Al and Nep are cutting the fiber cement trim boards, from Certainteed, to fit. These trim boards will be the finished surface around all of the clerestory windows.

The South side of the North gable shows the Deck Armor, which is now under the solar mounts.  Note the layers of Deck Armor with Grace Ultra at the top.

The South side of the North gable shows the Deck Armor, which is now under the solar mounts. Note the layers of Deck Armor with Grace Ultra at the top.

Al and Nep put a piece of Grace Ultra, which is made with butyl, where the solar mounts are located.  This will provide waterproofing and withstand high heat from the solar mounts.

Al and Nep put a piece of Grace Ultra, which is made with butyl, where the solar mounts are located. This will provide waterproofing and withstand high heat from the solar mounts.

Solar mount in same location, on top of the Deck Armor, which is over the piece of Grace ultra.

Solar mount in same location, on top of the Deck Armor, which is over the piece of Grace ultra.

On the scales at Guadalupe Land Fill.  Note the line of trucks with construction waste.

On the scales at Guadalupe Land Fill. Note the line of trucks with construction waste.

Fully loaded, we weighted in at 5,300 lbs.

Fully loaded, we weighted in at 5,300 lbs ...

And weighted out at 5,160 lbs, for a net of 140 lbs of construction waste that is not recyclable.

And weighted out at 5,160 lbs, for a net of 140 lbs of construction waste that is not recyclable.

At White Cap Construction Supplies, to see the shakes that had just arrived and to review and order fasteners.

At White Cap Construction Supply, to see the shakes that had just arrived and to review and order fasteners.

There are two large pallets and one small pallet in our order.  The two large pallets will be delivered on Monday and Bryan could take the small pallet to our job site in the truck.

There are two large pallets and one small pallet in our order. The two large pallets will be delivered on Monday and Bryan could take the small pallet, shown in the photo, to our job site in the truck.

The small pallet was in two pieces.  The large part was loaded on the truck and Bryan will load these pieces by hand.

The small pallet was in two pieces. Trish, operating the fork lift, had loaded the large pallet and moved the smaller pallet for Bryan to load by hand.

Fully loaded truck!  The sill pan is on the top rack and the shakes and caps are in the box.  A very full load (especially for the drive back to the job site on Interstate 880).

Fully loaded truck! The sill pan is on the top rack and the shakes and caps are in the box. A very full load (especially for the drive back to the job site on Interstate 880).

The shakes and ridge caps are staged in the garage, where they will stay dry until they are prepared with an oil finish.

The shakes and ridge caps are staged in the garage, where they will stay dry until they are prepared with an oil finish.

Nep put the first coat of paint on each of the exposed sides of each fiber cement trim.  Also, all cut edge were painted with the combination primer and paint.  The second coat will be applied after the trim pieces are nailed in place.

Nep put the first coat of paint on each of the exposed sides of each fiber cement trim. Also, all cut edge were painted with the combination primer and paint. The second coat will be applied after the trim pieces are nailed in place.

Running Cable to Our 400 Amp Electrical Panel

Tuesday, November 9th, 2010

The crew from PG&E arrived on Via Sereno this morning to prepare to run the new wires from the transformer to the underground electrical vault two doors up the street from us.  At the same time, they were prepared to run the three cables from the newly constructed underground electrical vault installed yesterday through the three inch underground conduit to our 400 amp combined service entry device (electrical panel).

Although the temporary electrical service is still in place, pulling the wires from the underground vault to our electrical panel will save time and resources when we need to ‘heat up’ our panel.

So the team from PG&E pulled the three wires through to our panel.  It went quite easily since there are only two 90 degree bends in the 25 ft 3 inch conduit.  Bryan had the 2,500 lb pull tape in the conduit from the mandrel inspection on September 8, 2010.

Also, Bryan met with the City of Monte Serenp’s attorney, Kirsten Powell, regarding changing the City of Monte Sereno’s sign ordinance so we could have a temporary sign on our property and meet the criteria for Awareness and Education.  This has been in progress for almost 18 months now.  Kirsten explained what the issues are and that she will recommend to the City Manager, Brian Loventhal, how to move forward.

The sign ordinance will be interesting …

The cable truck from PG&E arrived on Via Sereno this morning, towing a trailer with the electrical cable.

The cable truck from PG&E arrived on Via Sereno this morning, towing a trailer with the electrical cable.

The new three electical feed cables were pulled from our 400 amp combined service entry device (electrical panel) to the underground concrete vault.  The PG&E worker is feeding the cable into the conduit.

The new three electical feed cables were pulled from our 400 amp combined service entry device (electrical panel) to the underground concrete vault. The PG&E worker is feeding the cable into the conduit.

The cables emerge at the underground concrete vault, which was installed yesterday, at the front of our property.

The cables emerge at the underground concrete vault, which was installed yesterday, at the front of our property.

View from the underground concrete vault back to the 400 amp panel, where the electrical cables are coming out.

View from the underground concrete vault back to the 400 amp panel, where the electrical cables are coming out.

Underground concrete vault, with the new electrical cables going to our combined service entry device.  Note the three inch conduit at the left side of the box.

Underground concrete vault, with the new electrical cables going to our combined service entry device. Note the three inch conduit at the left side of the box.

Installing Our ‘Cool Roof’ System

Wednesday, September 15th, 2010

The team from Statewide Roofing arrived promptly at 8:00 am this morning to install our cool roof system.   We need to get the flat roof completed before the rains come this weekend.  Depending on which forecast one follows, there is a 10% to 40% chance of rain on Saturday and/or Sunday.

We need a roof.  And a ‘cool roof’ would be way cool.

Designing Our ‘Cool Roof’

Our roof serves multiple purposes.  First, it provides us with shelter (go figure).  Beyond this basic function, we have the following requirements:

  • Reduce our heating and cooling requirements.
  • Allow us to capture 100% of the rainwater from the entire roof.
  • Reduce our maintenance requirements.
  • Support our solar photovoltaic panels.

The benefits that we will enjoy from our roof design include:

  • Reduced energy costs, due to reduced energy consumption and the generation of electricity.
  • Reduced maintenance costs, due to lower maintenance requirements and faster and easier maintenance activitivies.
  • Increased occupant comfort, due to higher temperatures in the winter and cooler temperatures in the summer.

Roof Surfaces and Defining a ‘Cool Roof’

According to Johns Manville’s handbook on single ply roofing systems,

‘Roof surface temperature is important to reducing air conditioning energy usage and mitigating the Urban Heat Island Effect. Cool roof surfaces minimize heat build-up in the roof membrane caused by solar radiation (the sun) and the transfer of heat from the hot roof into the building. The roof is one of the first lines of defense against the effects of the sun on and in a building. In addition, roof insulation plays a critical role in reducing the heat flow into the building. With proper insulation and the addition of cool roofing products, heat transfer into a building can be reduced significantly.

A cool roof surface is defined by two mechanisms, reflectivity and emissivity. The higher the reflection of the total solar energy spectrum (called the albedo), the less solar energy is absorbed. The second mechanism, emissivity, is the amount of absorbed heat that is re-radiated back into the atmosphere. Thermal emissivity is expressed as a percentage relative to an ideal radiating surface, which is defined as having an emissivity of 100%. Thus, when less energy is absorbed (high solar reflectivity) and more of the absorbed energy is emitted (high thermal emissivity), there is less thermal energy (e.g., heat) in the roof to enter the building. For example, metals have low emissivity, and that is the reason why a highly reflective piece of metal left in the sun still becomes hot compared to a highly reflective, more emissive roof membrane. Reflectance and emittance with proper insulation are critical properties to a properly functioning cool roof.’

What could be cooler than a ‘cool roof’? 

Eliminating Water from Ponding on Our Roof

Starting with shelter, we don’t want the roof to leak.  On our 12:12 pitch gable roofs, this will not be a problem.  However, on our flat roofs (upper-, mid- and lower flat roofs), we may experience ‘ponding’.  Allan Courtney, our roofing advisor and roofing contractor, recommended that we design the flat roofs to direct water to the drains.  Note that all of the water from our gable roofs, and upper- and mid level flat roofs goes onto our lower flat roof.  This can be a lot of water.  Al doesn’t want there to be any ‘flat’ areas on our roof for water to pond.  Ponded water is bad, as it can be a source of water that could then leaks into our house.  We would very much prefer that 100.0% of the water from our roof go into our underground cistern.

In addition, ponded water is heavy, which increases the load on the structure.  Increasing the load can cause the roof to deflect, causing more ponding.  More ponding can cause more deflection …

So, Al recommended that we have tapered foam crickets from Johns Manville.  Each of the tapered foam crickets are manufactured in 4 ft x 4 ft pieces from closed cell polyisocyanurate foam. 

ENRGY 3® and ISO 3™ are rigid roof insulation boards composed of a closed cell polyisocyanurate foam core bonded in the manufacturing process to universal fiber glass reinforced facers. ENRGY 3 and ISO 3 utilize an environmentally compliant blowing agent containing pentane hydrocarbon to enhance the thermal performance of the foam insulation. This hydrocarbon has zero ozone depletion potential and conforms to the Montreal Protocol established in 1987. ENRGY 3 and ISO 3 meet the physical property requirements of ASTM C 1289, Type II, Class I, Grade 2 and CAN/ULC S704, Type 2, Class 2. ENRGY 3 and ISO 3 specialty products are also available as tapered panels, precut miters and precut crickets.

To direct the water to the drains, the crickets need to be engineered so that, in every instance, there is a downward slope that leads to a drain.  Johns Manville provided us with this design service as it is included in the cost of their product.  Here is the design of our tapered insulation, which Leo Richardson drafted.

Although we don’t need to have additional R-value for our roof, installing tapered insulation as crickets will eliminate the structural thermal bridges on our flat roofs. 

Reducing Energy Consumption

Our roof design started with reducing our energy consumption, which is one of the reasons for using SIPs (structural insulated panels).  Our SIP roof provides thermal resistance of R-47.  This high thermal resistance does not prevent solar radiation from reaching the inside of the house and heating the house.  To reduce energy consumption for cooling the house, we need to reflect that heat back into the sky.  Reflecting solar radiation can be accomplished with a roof surface with high solar reflectance and high thermal emittance.  This is the value of a light colored (e.g., white) roof.

The R-47 thermal resistance does not include the structural elements inside the SIPs that create thermal bridges.  For example, we have a 5.25×16 SCL (structural composite lumber) in the center of our upper flat roof that is not insulated.  Without the tapered insulation, we would have thermal bridges where heat (energy) can escape, or enter, our house.  The tapered insulation will reduce the thermal bridges as it will add, on average, R-7.5 to our thermal envelope on our flat roofs.

Components of Our Roofing System

In evaluating the roof surface over the SIPs, Al recommended a white, 60 mil TPO Membrane from Johns Manville.  This product has an extremely high initial solar reflectance of 0.77 and an extremely high initial thermal emittance of 87%.  To put these values into context, meeting the EPA’s Energy Star standards requires a solar reflectance of 0.65 and meeting the higher standards of California’s Title 24 requirements for commercial buildings requires solar reflectance of 0.70 and thermal emittance of 75%.

Al recommended TPO Membrane as it is manufactured from thermoplastic polyolefin (TPO).  Single ply roof membranes are manufactured using EPDM, PVC or TPO.  Al prefers TPO because it is easier to keep clean, which lowers our maintance requirements and, consequently, maintenance costs.  Dirt will lower the solar reflectance and lower the thermal emittance.

JM TPO is one of the latest single ply, flat roofing materials on the market. The current membrane formulations are reinforced with a polyester fabric and manufactured using an ultraviolet-resistant thermoplastic polyolefin formulation. TPO from JM comes in several thicknesses. It is designed for use in mechanically fastened and adhered roofing applications in new, re-roof and re-cover roof constructions. It is fire and chemical resistant and contains UV inhibitors for added longevity.

Products with a longer useful and functional life contribute to the durability of the building envelope, which can result in a lower overall total cost of ownership for our house.

Regarding the attachment system, Al recommended that we go with mechanical fasteners.  The alternative is a fully adhered roof membrane.  Given his experience, Al recommended that we use Carlisle’s HP-x fasteners with 3 inch plates for the tapered insulation and 2-3/8 inch Piranha plates to mechanically fasten the membrane.

Over the tapered foam insulation and under the single ply membrane, Al recommended FR-10 slip sheet.  The slip sheet serves two purposes – allows the membrane to move as it expands and contracts with heat and cold, and adds protection against flame spread and flame penetration through the roof system.

Roof installation instructions.

Roof installation instructions.

Installing Our Cool Roof

The six-person team from Statewide Roofing brought a portable diesel generator on our site and moved their tools onto the roof.  Then, the roofing materials arrived from Ford Wholesale, and they were placed on our roof with a rear pivot steer Telehandler.

The team got to work quickly, cleaning the debris from the roof and distributing the 4×4 sections of tapered insulation.  Then, they attached the insulation with screws to the SIPs and put down the slip sheets.  The membrane went down next, fastened with the screws and Piranha plates.

Then, the detail work started, which is welding the seams of the membrane.  it was a sunny, hot day, and the new white membrane reflected the solar heat, making it even hotter for the team working on the roof.

All of the tapered foam insulation that was secured to the roof was covered before the team left for the day.

Way cool …

Ready for the materails to arrive and be lifted onto the roof.

Ready for the materials to arrive and be lifted onto the roof.

The Telehandler unloads the roofing materials on Via Sereno.

The Telehandler unloads our roofing materials on Via Sereno.

Placing the materials on the roof.

Placing the materials on the roof.

Our neighbor from Vista Avenue, Robin Wedel, was walking her dog around the block and stopped in for a visit.  Justin Barlett, on the left, was working on pressurizing our geothermal ground loop.

Our neighbor from Vista Avenue, Robin Wedell, was walking her dog around the block and stopped in for a visit. Justin Barlett, on the left, was working on pressurizing our geothermal ground loop.

Roofing the lower flat roof on the West side of the house.  Note the FR-10 slip sheet and the fasteners holding down the white single ply membrane.

Roofing the lower flat roof on the West side of the house. Note the FR-10 slip sheet and the fasteners holding down the white single ply membrane.

Completing the detailed work on the upper flat roof.  The seams are welded with a special hand held hot air welding tool.

Completing the detailed work on the upper flat roof. The seams are welded with a special hand held hot air welding tool.

4x4 sheets of Enrgy3 Tapered Foam Insulation from Johns Manville.

4x4 sheets of ENRGY 3 tapered foam insulation from Johns Manville.

A bucket of 2-3/8 inch Pirahna plates.

A bucket of 2-3/8 inch Pirahna plates.

Roll of FR-10 slip sheet material, which allows the membrane to expand and contract, and provides protection from the spread of fire through our roof assembly.

Roll of FR-10 slip sheet material, which allows the membrane to expand and contract, and provides protection from the spread of fire through our roof assembly.

Fasteners for the insulation and roof membrane.

Fasteners for the insulation and roof membrane.