Posts Tagged ‘Carole Murray’

Scrambling Before the Rains Arrive

Friday, November 19th, 2010

Bryan returned from Edmonton last night and scrambled today in order to prepare for the rains forecasted through the weekend.

While Bryan was in Edmonton, Al and Nep completed putting the Deck Armor on the gable roofs and even managed to put Grace Ultra (butyl) under the Deck Armor before re-attaching the solar mounts.  This will ensure that the roof deck is completely watertight.

Taking 160 lbs of Construction Waste to Guadalupe Land Fill

Bryan took another load of construction waste to Guadalupe land fill.  This load was packaging materials that could not be recycled.  The weight in was 5,300 lbs and the weight out was 5,140 lbs; net for this load was 160 lbs.

Our Shakes Arrived from British Columbia!

The yellow cedar shakes that we purchased from BCF Shake Mill on Vancouver Island arrived at White Cap Construction Supply today.  Bryan took a truck load of shakes to the job site today and the other two pallets will be delivered on Monday.

We plan to store shakes in the Garage and need to use an oil preserve on each shake (front and back) to increase their useful life.  Durability is important …

Before going to White Cap, Bryan stopped by Top Gun Industrial Finishing to get the final sill pan that was painted for us.  Bryan couldn’t take this large piece on Monday.  Also, he picked up more stainless steel fasteners from Lord & Sons.  These items will allow the team from Earth Bound Homes to complete our window and door installation.

Meeting with Carole Murray

Bryan showed Nathan Merrill, from American Ornamental Iron, the newly painted sill pans.  Nathan was interested in the Kynar paint.  During their discussion, Nathan reminded Bryan that the door design cannot be completed without selecting the door hardware.  The hardware includes the door handles (interior and exterior) and the lockset.  Bryan asked Nathan where we should go.  Nathan replied, ‘Carole Murray.’

We were fortunate to catch Carole in her showroom and Bryan spent 20 minutes with her outlining the design for the front door.  Carole recommended that we review the door handles and locksets made by FSB, which she distributes.

As well, Carole was adamant that the front door be as tall as possible, and not the 6 ft 8 inch height of the original door.  She believes that the front door should make a statement, and that it should not be modest.  Bryan explained that the door can only be 36 inches wide, so having an 8 ft tall door could appear to be too skinny.  Carole responded matter of factly, ‘Doors are like women.  They can’t be too tall or too skinny.’

Bryan then consulted with Nathan for his thoughts on the door height.  Nathan considered the light and other matters, and said that he would think about it over the weekend.

We mocked up the change using an image from ArchiCAD.  What do you think?

Rendering of front of house, with the door height at 6 ft 8 inches.

Rendering of front of house, with the door height at 6 ft 8 inches.

Rendering of full height door.  The door could be wider by making the net door opening to be 36 inches.  The hardwood floor, inside the house and across the bridge, will be exactly 36 inches wide.

Rendering of full height door. The door could be wider by making the net door opening to be 36 inches. The hardwood floor, inside the house and across the bridge, will be exactly 36 inches wide.

Newly painted custom sill pan, in the Master Bedroom where a casement window will be located.  Note the radiant barrier on the exterior of the house, where the rainscreen will be.

Newly painted custom sill pan, in the Master Bedroom where a casement window will be located. Note the radiant barrier on the exterior of the house, where the rainscreen will be.

On the roof, reviewing the Deck Armor that Al and Nep installed over the last two days.

On the roof, reviewing the Deck Armor that Al and Nep installed over the last two days.

Al and Nep are cutting the fiber cement boards, from Certainteed, that will be the finished surface around all of the clerestory windows.

Al and Nep are cutting the fiber cement trim boards, from Certainteed, to fit. These trim boards will be the finished surface around all of the clerestory windows.

The South side of the North gable shows the Deck Armor, which is now under the solar mounts.  Note the layers of Deck Armor with Grace Ultra at the top.

The South side of the North gable shows the Deck Armor, which is now under the solar mounts. Note the layers of Deck Armor with Grace Ultra at the top.

Al and Nep put a piece of Grace Ultra, which is made with butyl, where the solar mounts are located.  This will provide waterproofing and withstand high heat from the solar mounts.

Al and Nep put a piece of Grace Ultra, which is made with butyl, where the solar mounts are located. This will provide waterproofing and withstand high heat from the solar mounts.

Solar mount in same location, on top of the Deck Armor, which is over the piece of Grace ultra.

Solar mount in same location, on top of the Deck Armor, which is over the piece of Grace ultra.

On the scales at Guadalupe Land Fill.  Note the line of trucks with construction waste.

On the scales at Guadalupe Land Fill. Note the line of trucks with construction waste.

Fully loaded, we weighted in at 5,300 lbs.

Fully loaded, we weighted in at 5,300 lbs ...

And weighted out at 5,160 lbs, for a net of 140 lbs of construction waste that is not recyclable.

And weighted out at 5,160 lbs, for a net of 140 lbs of construction waste that is not recyclable.

At White Cap Construction Supplies, to see the shakes that had just arrived and to review and order fasteners.

At White Cap Construction Supply, to see the shakes that had just arrived and to review and order fasteners.

There are two large pallets and one small pallet in our order.  The two large pallets will be delivered on Monday and Bryan could take the small pallet to our job site in the truck.

There are two large pallets and one small pallet in our order. The two large pallets will be delivered on Monday and Bryan could take the small pallet, shown in the photo, to our job site in the truck.

The small pallet was in two pieces.  The large part was loaded on the truck and Bryan will load these pieces by hand.

The small pallet was in two pieces. Trish, operating the fork lift, had loaded the large pallet and moved the smaller pallet for Bryan to load by hand.

Fully loaded truck!  The sill pan is on the top rack and the shakes and caps are in the box.  A very full load (especially for the drive back to the job site on Interstate 880).

Fully loaded truck! The sill pan is on the top rack and the shakes and caps are in the box. A very full load (especially for the drive back to the job site on Interstate 880).

The shakes and ridge caps are staged in the garage, where they will stay dry until they are prepared with an oil finish.

The shakes and ridge caps are staged in the garage, where they will stay dry until they are prepared with an oil finish.

Nep put the first coat of paint on each of the exposed sides of each fiber cement trim.  Also, all cut edge were painted with the combination primer and paint.  The second coat will be applied after the trim pieces are nailed in place.

Nep put the first coat of paint on each of the exposed sides of each fiber cement trim. Also, all cut edge were painted with the combination primer and paint. The second coat will be applied after the trim pieces are nailed in place.

Working with Murray Windows and Preparing to Pour Concrete Tomorrow

Monday, November 30th, 2009

We have been working with Carole Murray and Annie Rouse of Murray Windows & Door, Inc.  Carole and Annie came to the job site today to review where we are and do some field measurements.  Also, today is the final preparations before we pour concrete in the lower level tomorrow morning.

Carole Murray and Annie Rouse Visit Our Job Site

After meeting with Carole and Annie in their offices in Campbell, Bryan suggested they come to the job site and review the openings for the sliding doors and windows to see the issues first hand.  Although we have computer renderings of the house from various angles, there is no substitute for seeing the scale and connections in person.

Carole has suggested that we change the bifold patio door system that is at the back of our house to a large sliding glass pocket door.  This pocket door will go behind our feature concrete wall in the dining room.  We need to confirm the details on how this will work.  In addition, we will have to submit revised plans to the City of Monte Sereno as this will increase the size of the house by approximately 12 square feet.

Carole Murray (right) and Annie Rouse (left) reviewing the job site.

Carole Murray (right) and Annie Rouse (left) reviewing the job site.

Annie taking notes.

Annie taking notes.

Final Preparations Before Pouring Concrete Tomorrow

it seems there are always last minute things to do before pouring concrete.  Or, it seems like Bryan leaves things to the last minute.

The two remaining items were for Bryan to (1) insulate the PEX where the supply and return lines come together near the manifold; and (2) take photos of the PEX that will be embedded in concrete. 

Insulating the PEX increases the performance of the system by allowing the supply line (hot) to be insulated from the return line (cold) so the hot water in the supply line is not cooled by the cooler water in the return line.  This important task was easy to do and only took a few minutes.

Taking photos was simply a matter of going around the perimeter with the measuring tape and camera. 

With these two items completed … let’s pour concrete!

Lights on, looking left ...

Lights on, looking left ...

Looking center ...

Looking center ...

And, looking right.

And, looking right.

 

PEX in place by the Snack Area (exit sliding door on the left).

PEX in place by the Snack Area (exit sliding door on the left).

Insulated PEX in concrete in Nik's Room/Lower Powder Room.

Insulated PEX in concrete in Nik's Room/Lower Powder Room.

 

PEX coming into manifold in the West Air Handler room.  Note the insulated PEX.

PEX coming into manifold in the West Air Handler room. Note the insulated PEX.

 

 

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