Posts Tagged ‘Hollow Core Concrete Panels’

Coring Through Our Concrete – Day 2

Tuesday, May 17th, 2011

We finished our ‘coring’ today.  All of the penetrations through our concrete floor (between the ground floor and lower level) were completed.  The technician from Penhall Company did a great job.  He was courteous, fast, professional, safe and fun.

Most of the locations where we were coring were over walls in the lower level (basement) so Al and his team have lots of ‘clean up’ to complete where the framing had to be removed.  No problem – Al will piece it back together quickly.

The beautiful thing is that our plumbing team, Wenger Plumbing, can return to our site and complete the rough plumbing.  This is the predecessor task to completing the electrical, hydronic heating/cooling, central vacuum and other tasks. 

Daylight is burning – we need to move forward. 

Coringthe water supply in the shower wall.

Coring the water supply in the shower wall.

Starting to core an 1-1/2 inch hole ...

Starting to core an 1-1/2 inch hole …

Continuing to core at 1 minute 10 seconds ...

Continuing to core at 1 minute 10 seconds …

Completed at 1 minute 42 seconds!

Completed at 1 minute 42 seconds!

Coring a 5-inch hole for the drain in the tub in the Master Bath.  This is a huge hole and, no, we didnt hit the PEX!

Coring a 5-inch hole for the drain in the tub in the Master Bath. This is a huge hole and, no, we didn’t hit the PEX!

Coring Through Our Concrete – Day 1

Monday, May 16th, 2011

After confirming the location of our PEX in the concrete, we started coring through the penetrations today.  As before, we had Penhall Company send a technician to do the coring.

The penetrations are for water supply (hot and cold), drains, drain vents, air ducts, hydronic heating/cooling (supply and return), and electrical wiring.  The holes (penetrations) range in size from 1-1/4 inch through to 5 inches.

We completed more than half of the penetrations today.  We will complete the coring tomorrow.

Getting set up to core through the concrete floor under the island in the Kitchen.

Getting set up to core through the concrete floor under the island in the Kitchen.

Coring the third hole (in a line).  Hot water supply, cold water supply, and the drain.  These penetrations are with the wall in the Guest Suite below.

Coring the third hole (in a line). Hot water supply, cold water supply, and the drain. These penetrations are aligned with the wall in the Guest Suite below.

One of the five-inch cores was directly in line with the void in one of our hollow core concrete panels.  This core shows the void and the 5-1/4 inches of concrete on top of the hollow core concrete panel.

One of the five-inch cores was directly in line with the void in one of our hollow core concrete panels. This core shows the void and the 5-1/4 inches of concrete on top of the hollow core concrete panel.

We drilled the hole for the tub drain in Kates bathroom, and managed to avoid hitting the PEX!

We drilled the hole for the tub drain in Kate’s bathroom, and managed to avoid hitting the PEX!

There are a number of penetrations under the sink in Kates bathroom.  The two 4-1/2 inch holes on the left are for both dryer vents, and the 4-1/2 inch hole on the right is for the supply air into Kates bedroom for the displacement air ventilation.

There are a number of penetrations under the sink in Kate’s bathroom. The two 4-1/2 inch holes on the left are for both dryer vents, and the 4-1/2 inch hole on the right is for the supply air into Kates bedroom for the displacement air ventilation.

Furring the Ceiling in the Lower Level

Monday, February 1st, 2010

The final parts of the framing with wrapping up in our lower level today.  As well, we started the furring under the hollow core concrete panels.

Furring the Ceiling

We designed the basement ceiling to reuse the Redwood decking from the original house, which has been ripped in two and remilled by Jackel Enterprises in Watsonville.

The 5/8-inch Redwood tongue and groove material must be fastened to the hollow core concrete panels so we need 2×4 furring to be attached to the hollow core concrete panels.  Since the hollow core concrete panels have a slight camber, the 2×4 furring strips need to be shimmed so they are level.  We are attaching the pressure-treated furring with GRK Caliburn screws, or equivalent.

The bearing wall under the W14x43 steel beam has been strengthened by sistering in additional 2x6 studs and then adding horizontal blocking.

The bearing wall under the W14x43 steel beam has been strengthened by sistering in additional 2x6 studs and then adding horizontal blocking.

We are dropping the ceiling in the Wine Dining so we can insulate the ceiling and have this room be seen as a very different space from the rest of the lower level.

We are dropping the ceiling in the Wine Dining so we can insulate the ceiling and have this room be seen as a very different space from the rest of the lower level.

The ceiling is dropped in the West Mechanical room so we can insulate it as Kate's bedroom is above it.  The West Mechanical room will house our electric pumps, which are part of our geothermal heat exchange.

The ceiling is dropped in the West Mechanical room so we can insulate it as Kate's bedroom is above it. The West Mechanical room will house our electric pumps, which are part of our geothermal heat exchange.

Caliburn concrete screws, from GRK.

Caliburn concrete screws, from GRK.

Titen Masonry screws, from Simpson Strong Tie.

Titen Masonry screws, from Simpson Strong Tie.

Pressure treated 2x4 furring in the Play Area.  Note the cedar shims.

Pressure treated 2x4 furring in the Play Area. Note the cedar shims.

Furring and soffits in the Snack Area.

Furring and soffits in the Snack Area.

Scott Andersen’s Design in Panama

Our good friend, Scott Andersen, has been working with an architect in Panama to design a house.  As background, Scott worked with us on the conceptual design for our house and he has over 20 years of designing contempory homes in Toronto, Canada.  The rendering of the house shows plenty of concrete, glass and steel, with an infinity edge pool and spectacular views.  Definitely an ‘adult’ house.

The question is, ‘How fast can this house be built?’ with the follow on question, ‘Will the house in Panama be completed before our house in completed?’.

Rendering of a house in Panama.

Rendering of a house in Panama.

Setting the Reinforcing Steel Over the Hollow Core Concrete Panels

Wednesday, November 11th, 2009

After checking the perimeter forms, Bill Brown’s team started laying out the reinforcing steel (rebar) over the hollow core concrete panels on our ground floor. There will be at least three inches of concrete covering all of the hollow core concrete panels.

Lots of Steel

In the living areas, we are using #3 rebar, 18 inches on center, each way.  Interpreting this, the rebar is 3/8 of an inch in diameter and it is put down in a grid, with each ‘square’ 18 inches by 18 inches.  The garage will have #3 rebar, set 12 inches on center each way.

Also, we are pouring concrete to two levels on our ground floor.  Where there is hardwood flooring, we are pouring 3 inches of concrete over the hollow core concrete panels.  Where there is exposed concrete, we are pouring 5.25 inches of concrete. 

Where there is exposed concrete, we will have the PEX tubing for our radiant heating set on top of the rebar.  We will have to ensure the PEX is fastened securely to the rebar so it doesn’t float up in the concrete where it could be damaged by the 1/2 inch deep saw cuts in the concrete that are designed to control the cracking that will occur in the concrete.

Starting to tie the rebar together.

Starting to tie the rebar together.

The rebar is set at 18 inches on center, each way.  The intersections are tied together with wire to hold the rebar in place until the concrete is poured and cured.

The rebar is set at 18 inches on center, each way. The intersections are tied together with wire to hold the rebar in place until the concrete is poured and cured.

 

Setting forms by the Bridge Hall at the front of the house.

Setting forms by the Bridge Hall at the front of the house.

Forms in place at the front of the living room.  This edge, with the concrete and steel I-beam, will be seen by everyone when they enter the house.

Forms in place at the front of the living room. This edge, with the concrete and steel I-beam, will be seen by everyone when they enter the house.

Rebar in place at the front of the house (but not in the garage).

Rebar in place at the front of the house (but not in the garage).

Jorge recording hours at the end of the day.

Jorge recording hours at the end of the day.

It is good to see the rebar mat in place as we want to complete pouring concrete before Thanksgiving.

It is good to see the rebar mat in place as we want to complete pouring concrete before Thanksgiving.

Trimming a Hollow Core Concrete Panel

Tuesday, September 15th, 2009

One of our hollow core concrete panels is a bit too wide, so it needs to be trimmed.  Sounds easy, right?  Six inches thick and approximately 12 feet long.  Take 2-3/8 inches off.

A local Home Depot rents concrete saws.  For the 4 hour minimum, the charges are approximately $60 for the saw and $60 for the saw blade.  And $7 extra in case something breaks.

Dustin Barclay, from Teamwrkx, was available to help this morning.  He agreed to meet Bryan at the job site at 8:45 am, after Bryan picked up the concrete saw and blade from The Home Depot.

Pickup Up the Concrete Saw

At The Home Depot.

At The Home Depot.

Concrete saw loaded and ready to go.

Concrete saw loaded and ready to go.

At the Job Site

Dustin met Bryan at the job site and helped unload the concrete saw and get it into position.  Clean the area, snap a chalkline, hook up the water hose, and start cutting!

Saw is unloaded and ready, job site is being cleaned up.

Saw is unloaded and ready, job site is being cleaned up.

Snapped the chalk line.  Measure twice, cut once.

Snapped the chalk line. Measure twice, cut once.

Looks good, we're ready to start sawing.

Looks good, we're ready to start sawing.

Cut! Dustin and Bryan made two cuts, and the resulting cut was a bit more than expected.  This will allow a good, wide, stong edge on the steel beam.

Cut! Dustin and Bryan made two cuts, and the resulting cut was a bit more than expected. This will allow a good, wide, stong edge on the steel beam.

Completed the cut.  Time to clean up now.

Completed the cut. Time to clean up now.

The cut piece at the front of the house.  It was heavy!

The cut piece at the front of the house. It was heavy!

 

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Placing Our Structural Steel

Friday, May 8th, 2009

Today was a huge milestone for our project.  Our structural steel is now in place, ready for the hollow core concrete panels.

Preparing for the Day

It was a perfect blue-sky, California day to place our steel columns and beams.  Not a cloud in the sky and a faint breeze to keep everything cool and comfortable.  Our 35-ton crane, from West Coast Cranes, arrived on time with the truck carrying our steel columns and beams.

Our crane, from West Coast Cranes, arrived on site promptly this morning to get set up.

Our crane, from West Coast Cranes, arrived on site promptly this morning to get set up.

The team from Larson Steel setting the bolt heights in the pockets for the steel beams.

The team from Larson Steel setting the bolt heights in the pockets for the steel beams.

The truck with our steel columns and beams arrived and is waiting on Winchester Boulevard.

The truck with our steel columns and beams arrived and is waiting on Winchester Boulevard.

35 ton crane from West Coast Cranes starting to extend its boom.

35 ton crane from West Coast Cranes starting to extend its boom.

Note how the five outriggers are extended to level and stabilize the crane.
Note how the five outriggers are extended to level and stabilize the crane.

Having a large crane in place on a beautiful day appeared to be a trigger for visitors.  For example, Wes Wenger (Wenger Plumbing) came by as did Doug Ferannte (Los Gatos Glass).  Both had positive comments on our project as it continues to move forward.

Setting the Steel Columns in Place

The eight steel columns were set in place first, on the bolts that Bill Brown’s team embedded in the structural concrete on March 6, 2009.  These steel columns will support the steel beams.

First steel column coming from the truck.

First steel column coming from the truck.

Our first steel column being set in place by the crane.

Our first steel column being set in place by the crane, with Hector Guerra guiding it.

The last steel column is in place and the bolts are being adjusted and tightened.

The last steel column is in place and the bolts are being adjusted and tightened.

Placing the Steel Beams

We have five steel drop beams that are supported by the steel columns and foundation wall.  These drop beams support two steel flush beams.

Moving the first steel beam from the truck to the site.

Moving the first steel beam from the truck to the site.

Hector directing the first steel beam placement over the window well.

Hector Guerra directing the first steel beam placement over the window well.

Our 54 ft steel beam coming from the truck on Via Sereno.

Our 54 ft steel beam coming from the truck on Via Sereno.

Pete Larson's team putting the longest steel beam into place.

Pete Larson's team putting our longest steel beam into place.

Hector guides the steel beam over the Wine Cellar into position, taking extreme care not to touch the feature concrete wall in the Atrium.

Hector guides the steel beam over the Wine Cellar into position, taking extreme care not to touch the feature concrete wall in the Atrium.

Moving the first flush beam from Via Sereno into the site.

Moving the first flush beam from Via Sereno into the site.

 

Flush beam being lowered into place.

Flush beam being lowered into place.

Our crane operator worked well with the Pete Larson's team, ensuring that the beams were placed in position gently and safely, exactly as directed.

Our crane operator worked well with the Pete Larson's team, ensuring that the beams were placed in position gently and safely, exactly as directed. The owner of West Coast Cranes, Lowell Tucker came to our job site for a few minutes to observe the steel placement and ensure the work was going well (it was)..

First flush beam being positioned from the Atrium to the west foundation wall.

First flush beam being positioned from the Atrium to the west foundation wall.

Placing the drop beam under the Dining Room and Kitchen.  Note the crane operator is somewhat 'blind' as this beam is behind the Kitchen/Garage concrete feature wall.

Placing the drop beam under the Dining Room and Kitchen. Note the crane operator is somewhat 'blind' as this beam is behind the Kitchen/Garage concrete feature wall.

Hector Guerra directing Pete Larson's on-site team.

Hector Guerra directing Pete Larson's on-site team.

John Rider Reviews the Steel Placement

John Rider (Jrider + Design), his wife Jenny, and Joel Lemons came to the site to see the steel beams being placed.  John was the focal point on our integrated design team as he ran the ArchiCAD model that was used to export and import DWG files from our design engineers to ensure all the components would ‘fit’ in our design.

John’s offices are located only minutes away on Hamilton Avenue in Campbell, California so they came just before going for lunch today.

We reflected on John’s site visit when the structural slab was poured using the boom pump truck, and smiled.

We had a several visitors come to see the steel columns and beams today.

We had a several visitors come to see the steel columns and beams today.

John Rider (left), Jenny Rider and Joel Lemons watching from the observation deck as the steel beams being placed.

John Rider (left), Jenny Rider and Joel Lemons watching from the observation deck as the steel beams being placed.

Our Structural Steel is in Place

With all the structural steel in place, the crane operator retracted the outriggers and secured the boom.  Then, he left the site.  Definitely a milestone event for us! 

Securing the boom and shutting down the crane.

Securing the boom and shutting down the crane.

'Hook time' was completed at 1:34 PM.  Done!

Visits by Our Neighbors

After Pete Larson’s team and the crane left the site, we received a couple visitors.

First, Phil Knopf and his wife, Bonnie, came to the site.  They have lived in Monte Sereno, on the other side of Winchester, for more than 30 years and have seen significant changes in our community during that time.  We know Phil through his continuing leadership with Los Gatos Little League, where both our son, Nik, and daughter, Kate, play AAA and T-ball, respectively.

Although Phil had visited our site before, it had been some time and Bonnie had not seen the plans.  They were most interested in our project so Bryan gave them a thorough tour and explained the design features and energy-saving elements.  Phil and Bonnie were the first people to walk down the exterior concrete steps into the lower level.

John McLaren, a neighbor that lives four houses away on Daves Avenue, came to the site and walked the property, noting the changes since his last visit.  He used our new exterior concrete stair and avoided the water that was soaking our feature concrete walls.  Since inception, John has followed and supported our project.  He seems particularly interested in our Wine Cellar.

Another neighbor, Kel Marchbank (Marcal Construction), was on his Harley and visited the site.  Kel was over yesterday and saw the site before the steel was placed today.  He was impressed with the progress today and is looking forward to seeing the hollow core concrete panels being placed on Tuesday.

Our neighbors, Phil and Bonnie Knopf, visiting our site.

Our neighbors, Phil and Bonnie Knopf, visiting our site.

Bonnie Knopf liked the steel beams that we placed today.

Bonnie Knopf liked the steel beams that we placed today.

Kel Marchbank stopped by to see the progress since his review yesterday.

Kel Marchbank stopped by to see the progress since his review yesterday.

 Bryan was smiling from ear-to-ear as he locked the gate.  It was a huge milestone today.