Posts Tagged ‘Larson Steel’

Staying on Track

Thursday, March 25th, 2010

Our project is complex and we’re doing our best to stay on track. 

However, our non-maleable building materials (i.e., concrete, glass and steel) make it difficult to correct mistakes or make other changes and, consequently, we’re taking more time and money than we had planned for this project.  That said, a LEED-H Platinum project, by definition, requires more thoughtful planning, material sourcing and handling, and documentation than otherwise.  Especially in an earthquake prone location with increasing seismic conditions.

So, comparing our budget, timeline and other elements to traditional projects, which are generally energy- and resource-intensive, is not appropriate.  But, no surprise, that comparison, and evaluation of our project management, is done by others every day. 

If we were using traditional building materials with traditional construction methods (i.e., stick framing, wooden floor joists and roof rafters, baseboards and door trim) then we should be on a much faster timeline and a lower budget.

We just need to get over it.

Assembling the Lower-Level Flat Roof

Around the entire perimeter of the house is the ‘lower-level flat roof’.  The ceiling height of this roof is identical to the existing house at 96 inches (8 ft).  The only exception to this is the roof at the back of the house, which sits above the lower-flat roof, which we call the ‘mid-level flat roof’.  Yesterday, the entire perimeter roof was completed as the mid-level flat roof connecting the Dining Room and Kate’s Bedroom was assembled.

Way cool.

Steel Flush Beam in SIP Roof

There is only one steel beam in our SIP roof and it is a flush beam that is hidden inside a SIP.  This is a critical beam that supports the upper-level flat roof over the Atrium and allows us to have only one post in the Kitchen area.  And, of course, have an extremely strong structure that meets the new code requirements for seismic conditions.

This steel flush beam sits on top of a lower-level roof SIP over the Garage and goes over the steel post in the Kitchen and is connected to a 7.00 x 11.25 inch Paralam beam that sits on the 8×12 Douglas Fir drop beam.  This steel beam will carry lateral forces into the concrete wall in the Garage so it must be connected robustly to that concrete wall.

The fabrication of the steel beam must include:

  • 5/8 inch Nelson studs to attach 2×6 nailers on the top and bottom;
  • a hole in the top and bottom flange to connect the beam to a 5/8-inch anchor bolt that is embedded in the concrete wall;
  • a Simpson GLT welded to the north end of the steel beam to connect it to the 7.00 x 11.25 Paralam flush beam;
  • two sets of 5/16 inch stiffeners welded in the locations where there are vertical loads (i.e., over the concrete wall and over the steel column);
  • four sets of plates welded to the flanges of the steel beam to connect to the 4×6 and 6×6 posts that support the upper-level flat roof; and
  • four bolts connecting the steel beam to the HSS 4×4 steel column in the Kitchen.

The steel beam must be the correct length and each of the components noted above must be in the correct locations.  Yeah, there is a lot going on with this steel beam.

Hosting Thien Doan’s Site Visit

Duquette Engineering designed the concrete foundation for the structure and Thien Doan did most of the work under Steve Duquette’s supervision.  Thien was at our project site numerous times observing the drilling of the holes for our concrete piers as well as the placement of the reinforcing steel (rebar) in the concrete slabs. 

When Steve Duquette attended our integrated project planning meeting on March 9, 2010, he said that he would like Thien to come by at this interim point in the project and take some pictures.

Thien came to the site today and walked the property with Bryan.  Thien was most interested in the SIPs and how the SIP wall and roof assembly was designed to transfer the shear forces to the concrete foundation walls.  Thien appeared impressed with the design and the construction, noting that there would probably be limited cracking of the sheet rock in the house during an 8.8 earthquake.

Reviewing the Shop Drawings for the Steel Beam with Larson Steel

Bryan drove to Larson Steel’s fabrication shop in Gilroy and met with William Zapeda to go over the measurements they took on Friday, March 19, prior to fabrication of the W8x18 steel beam.  They went over each of the measurements, noting one key area where Bryan needs to confirm with the lead framer from Earth Bound Homes, Francisco Espinoz.

William and Bryan went in the yard and reviewed the actual W8x18 steel beam and measured it.  The beam was a beautiful blue color, which is exactly what we would like the exposed steel beams and two steel columns to look like.

Finding Curb Damage in Los Gatos

The City of Monte Sereno requested that we have three 1-1/2 inch pipes carrying our excess water from our underground cistern to the curb on Winchester Boulevard, where it would then flow into the storm drain.  The engineers from the Town of Los Gatos did not like this design and requested that we connect our underground cistern with an 8-inch pipe connecting directly to the back of the storm drain.

They cited potential damage and maintenance issues as the reasons for requesting this change.  Today, Bryan saw a location where the 1-1/2 inch drain went though a concrete curb and had subsequent cracking and damage. 

Now, we can appreciate the request for a direct connection.

ArchiCAD rendering showing the W8x18 steel beam and the lower-level SIP roof.

ArchiCAD rendering showing the W8x18 steel beam and the lower-level SIP roof.

ArchiCAD rendering showing steel beam and posts supporting the upper-level flat roof structure.

ArchiCAD rendering showing steel beam and posts supporting the upper-level flat roof structure.

Mid-level flat roof at the back of the house.  This is where the three sliding glass panel doors will be located, which will go into a pocket behind the exposed concrete feature wall at the left of this photo (the Dining Room wall).

Mid-level flat roof at the back of the house. This is where the three sliding glass panel doors will be located, which will go into a pocket behind the exposed concrete feature wall at the left of this photo (the Dining Room wall).

View from the middle of swimming pool to the front door, showing the mid-level SIP roof that was assembled yesterday.

View from the middle of swimming pool to the front door, showing the mid-level SIP roof that was assembled yesterday.

Thien Doan, from Duquette Engineering, on the lower-flat roof over the Garage.

Thien Doan, from Duquette Engineering, on the lower-flat roof over the Garage.

View of Master Study and Master Bedroom showing completed 2x4 wall under 6x10 beam in Foyer and pony walls ready to receive the posts and ridge beams to support the SIP gable roof.

View of Master Study and Master Bedroom showing completed 2x4 wall under 6x10 beam in Foyer and pony walls ready to receive the posts and ridge beams to support the SIP gable roof.

Thien taking photos of the SIP roof structure.

Thien taking photos of the SIP roof structure.

Simpson Strong Tie HTT22 connecting the 6x6 post to the hollow core concrete panels.  Solid.

Simpson Strong Tie HTT22 connecting the 6x6 post to the hollow core concrete panels. Solid.

LPT4s in the Master Bedroom, reinforcing the SIP walls to the 6x10 flush beams in the SIP roof structure.

LPT4s in the Master Bedroom, reinforcing the SIP walls to the 6x10 flush beams in the SIP roof structure.

Exposed feature concrete wall at the back of the house, showing the space for the pocket that will hold the three sliding glass panels.  Note that we will be adding a drop beam under the mid-level flat roof.

Exposed feature concrete wall at the back of the house, showing the space for the pocket that will hold the three sliding glass panels. Note that we will be adding a drop beam under the mid-level flat roof.

Measuring the profile of the W8x18 steel beam in Larson Steel's yard in Gilroy.

Measuring the profile of the W8x18 steel beam in Larson Steel's yard in Gilroy

The W8x18 beam is 5-1/4 inches wide.

The W8x18 beam is 5-1/4 inches wide.

We like the blue color of the steel and are considering having all of the exposed structural steel in the house finished in gun-metal steel blue.

We like the blue color of the steel and are considering having all of the exposed structural steel in the house finished in gun-metal steel blue.

Concrete curb in Los Gatos, showing damage caused by the 1-1/2 inch pipe going through the curb.

Concrete curb in Los Gatos, showing damage caused by the 1-1/2 inch pipe going through the curb.

At the end of each day, Jo-Anne does her best to drop by and review our progress.  With the longer days and the time change, it is easier for her to do so.  And, it is always good to see her smiling!

At the end of each day, Jo-Anne does her best to drop by and review our progress. With the longer days and the time change, it is easier for her to do so. And, it is always good to see her smiling!

Taking Field Measurements for Our Steel Beam in the Roof

Friday, March 19th, 2010

There is one steel flush beam in our roof, which will not be visible.  However, this beam connects many of the key structural components together in the house and must be fabricated to very fine tolerances so it will fit into the SIP roof assembly and connect the components as designed.

Given it was a beautiful Friday afternoon, Reed Kingston stopped by with his two boys, Graham and Cole, to see the progress.  And walk around the roof!

Taking Field Measurements

We are putting a W8x18 steel flush beam into the SIP that connects the concrete wall in the Garage/Atrium with the 7.00 x 11.25 inch Paralam flush beam by the Living Room. 

This steel beam will have:

  • 2×6 nailers on the top and bottom, with Nelson studs connecting the nailers to the steel beam;
  • a hole in the top and bottom flange to connect the beam to a 5/8-inch anchor bolt that is embedded in the concrete wall;
  • six CS14 straps to connect the steel beam to the concrete shear wall;
  • a Simpson GLT welded to the north end of the steel beam to connect it to the 7.00 x 11.25 Paralam flush beam;
  • four sets of plates welded to the flanges of the steel beam to connect to the 4×6 and 6×6 posts that support the upper-flat roof; and
  • four bolts connecting the steel beam to the HSS 4×4 steek column in the Kitchen.

Yeah, there is a lot going on with this beam.

(We better get it right!)

Cole and Graham Kingston Visit Our Project Site

Reed Kingston brought his twin boys, Cole and Graham, to the project site this afternoon.  All three of the boys tour the site on a regular basis so they have a good understanding of where we were and how the projects unfolds.

William (left), from Larson Steel, and Francisco (right), from Earth Bound Homes, review the structural plans and identify the various connections for this beam.

William Zapeda (left), from Larson Steel, and Francisco Espinoz (right), from Earth Bound Homes, review the structural plans and identify the various connections for this beam.

William Zepeda, from Larson Steel, measuring the HSS 4x4 steel column in the Kitchen.

William Zepeda, from Larson Steel, measuring the HSS 4x4 steel column in the Kitchen.

Francisco Espinoz, Earth Bound Homes, measuring the W8x18 steel beam over the concrete wall in the Garage/Atrium.  The CS14 straps will go over and under the nailers that will be attached to the steel beam.

Francisco Espinoz, Earth Bound Homes, measuring the W8x18 steel beam over the concrete wall in the Garage/Atrium. The CS14 straps will go over and under the nailers that will be attached to the steel beam.

Reed Kingston with his two boys, Cole and Graham, went to each corner of the roof as they reviewed progress to date.

Reed Kingston with his two boys, Cole and Graham, went to each corner of the roof as they reviewed progress to date.

The FSC-certified LVL is now inside of SIP panels around the perimeter of the lower-flat roof.

The FSC-certified LVL is now inside of SIP panels around the perimeter of the lower-flat roof.

SIP roof over main entrance with LVL inside of SIP.

SIP roof over main entrance with LVL inside of SIP.

West side of front of house.  Note the window well to bring light into the lower level (and allow emergency egress).

West side of front of house. Note the window well to bring light into the lower level (and allow emergency egress).

The week ended on another beautiful, blue-sky California day.  The weather was the complete opposite of the torrential rains exactly one week ago today.

The week ended on another beautiful, blue-sky California day. The weather was the complete opposite of the torrential rains exactly one week ago today.

Pouring Concrete in the Garage

Tuesday, November 24th, 2009

It was a great day to pour concrete.  Everything went well today – Hector from Larson Steel was on time this morning as was Chris from Clausen Electric.

Completing Trim Work in the Basement

We needed to cut the excess bolts off the baseplates in the lower level, which hold the steel columns in place.  Hector Guerra was on time early this morning and Bryan helped him to cut the tops of the bolts off.  As well, Chris from Clausen Electric came by and installed the conduit and fixtures in the lower level by the exposed concrete wall.

It was good to stroke those two items off ‘the list’.

Hector cutting the bolts from the plates supporting the steel columns in the lower level.

Hector cutting the bolts from the plates supporting the steel columns in the lower level.

Done.

Done.

 

Chris puts the electrical fixtures and conduit in the floor.

Chris puts the electrical fixtures and conduit in the floor.

Pouring Concrete in the Garage

We poured the ground floor in three sections.  First, we poured the section at the front of the house, under the master suite which will be covered by hardwood flooring.  Then, we poured the rest of the ground floor, except for the garage.  Today, we poured the garage, which is 20 ft by 20 ft.  All of this concrete contains 70% slag.

The Graniterock truck showed up right on time and we ‘tailgated’ the concrete into the garage.  It was poured within 30 minutes and then Bill Brown’s team finished the concrete. 

We decided to use colored concrete so it will match the rest of the house (i.e., Harvest Gold).

The Graniterock truck arrives and is ready to 'tailgate' the concrete into the garage.

The Graniterock truck arrives and is ready to 'tailgate' the concrete into the garage.

Ready to pour concrete in the garage.

Ready to pour concrete in the garage.

Pouring colored concrete.

Pouring colored concrete.

Within minutes, we're half way done.

Within minutes, we're half way done.

Tailgating requires a bit more manual work than using the pumper truck ...

Tailgating requires a bit more manual work than using the pumper truck ...

We've got the concrete in place so the truck can clean up.

We've got the concrete in place so the truck can clean up.

Starting to 'screed' the concrete in the garage.

Starting to 'screed' the concrete in the garage.

Screeding is tougher than it looks as everyone has to work together as an integrated team to move the concrete and produce a flat surface without grooves or tracks.

Screeding is tougher than it looks as everyone has to work together as an integrated team to move the concrete and produce a flat surface without grooves or tracks.

Back to the lower level, and this photo shows the end of the loop in the atrium.

Back to the lower level, and this photo shows the end of the loop in the atrium.

The PEX is looking good in the lower level.  Our plan is to pour this next week.

The PEX is looking good in the lower level. Our plan is to pour this next week.

The completed concrete in the garage is looking good.

The completed concrete in the garage is looking good.

Our Posts are In!

Saturday, October 10th, 2009

With sprinkles in the weather forecast for Monday and rain on Tuesday, we needed to complete welding the final nine posts in place.  We had welded five of the fourteen posts on Thursday.

Welding the Posts

Tony Gutierrez and ‘Little Pete’ arrived just after 8:00 am this morning at our project site.  It was foggy and a bit cool. 

Bryan had the site prepared and the remaining posts laid out.  We were able to start quickly and soon completed the welding on post 33, at the top of the stairs.  This was a complex post as it needed base plates put in and grinding so we could align the bottom of the post correctly.

After post 33, we put post 28 in place, which is on the corner.  This one was a bit tougher and went ok.  Then, we struggled with post 27, an intermediate post.  Finally, it lined up on the third attempt.  We all wanted it perfect.

Back to the top of the staris and we put in post 32, which lined up nicely with post 28.  However, the next intermediate post, post 29, required cutting into the hollow core so we could weld it on all sides.  Posts 29 and 30 were a snap.

Posts in protective wrapping from Paramount Iron Railing Systems

Posts in protective wrapping from Paramount Modular Cable Railing Systems

Little Pete welding a shim in place for post 28.

Little Pete welding a shim in place for post 28.

Tony holding post 28 in place while Little Pete welds it.

Tony Gutierrez holding post 28 in place while Little Pete welds it.

Tony holds post 27 as Little Pete tacks it in place.  We got this one right on the third try.

Tony holds post 27 as Little Pete tacks it in place. We got this one right on the third try.

 Reed and Cole Drop Off a Router

We need to put some temporary railings on the posts so Reed Kingston came by with one of his boys, Cole, and dropped off a router.  They did a quick tour of the site and even tested the stairs.

Reed pointing out some key elements in the plans for his son, Cole.

Reed pointing out some key elements in the plans for his son, Cole.

 

Cole and Reed posing behind the plan table.

Cole and Reed posing behind the plan table.

We’re Done

Then, we moved to the front of the house, to weld posts 16 and 19 into place.  These are the first posts our visitors will see when they enter the house.   Post 16 was perfect.  Post 19 was a bit tough as the cap plate was rotated by 90 degrees.  Tony assessed the situation and explained how we could fix it easily.  Fifteen minutes later, it was in place.

We finished by tacking covers over five openings in the steel where concrete could possible flow when we continue pouring.

Then, we packed up and were done.  Bryan closed and locked the gate just before 2:30 pm.

Our posts are in!

Looking up from the bottom of the atrium.  It was a beautiful, blue-sky California day.

Looking up from the bottom of the atrium. It was a beautiful, blue-sky California day.

Our posts are in and looking great!

Our posts are in and looking great!

Posts 33 (left) and 32 (right), showing the bracings, etc. that will buried in concrete shortly.

Posts 33 (left) and 32 (right), showing the bracings, etc. that will buried in concrete shortly.

Completed posts.  Very nice.

Completed posts. Very nice.

Posts 16 (left) and 19 (right), which are the first two seen when coming in the front door.  Note the clean face of the posts (no holes).

Posts 16 (left) and 19 (right), which are the first two seen when coming in the front door. Note the clean face of the posts (no holes).

Welding Five Posts in Place

Thursday, October 8th, 2009

We welded 5 of the 15 posts in place today.  For a number of reasons, it took much longer than we expected.  We will need another day to weld the remaining 10 posts in place. 

Paramount Modular Cable Railing Systems did a fantastic job fabricating the posts for us.  The posts stainess steel welded to cylinders at the bottom, which will be embedded in the concrete.  The top of each post has a stainless steel bracket that will be recessed in the wooden top rail (Maple wood, from Canada).

Once these posts are welded into place, we will be able to pour more concrete so the posts will be embedded in concrete.

Establishing the Finished Floor Elevation

We had Jorge Ramirez from Bill Brown Construction come to our site this morning so we could ensure the finished floor elevation that he established earlier was consistent with our finished floor elevation for the posts.  The posts were designed and fabricated so the stainless steel shows above the concrete and the round carbon steel is embedded in the concrete (which is welded to the I-beams). 

We wanted to start at 8:00 am but both Jorge and the Larson Steel team were late in arriving.  This threw Bryan off his planned schedule, which included other items.

Jorge brought a laser level with him and, after getting new batteries at the local 7-11 store, we shot the elevation of the garage/kitchen door, which Jorge explained was the finished floor elevation.  This was within 1/16 inch of the elevation of the glass in the north side of Bridge Hall. It appears that the south end of the Bridge Hall is a quarter inch lower than the other three points.

We shot the elevations around the perimeter of the atrium and noted the distance to the finished floor.  We need to establish the elevations for the bottom of the posts so we can weld the posts to the steel I-beams. 

 Establishing the Welding Plan

Hector Guerra, who designed our bridges, arrived with Tony Gutierrez and ‘Little Hector’.  Tony will align the posts and Little Hector, who has been to our site several times, will do the welding.  We were fortunate to have Tony assigned to our project today.  He had extensive experience in making fences and other items from steel where having straight lines and vertically plumb posts are critical. 

Tony, left, and Hector G, right.

Tony Gutierrez, left, and Hector Guerra, right.

Hector and Tony reviewed the site and explained the strategy will be to establish a string line for height and straightness.  Then, the posts can be welded into place so they will be straight, not skewed, vertically plumb, and at the correct elevation. 

The first posts to be welded into place will be the end posts.  Then, the intermediate posts will be welded.  We started with the posts on the north side of the atrium.

Welding Five Posts

Tony and Little Hector completed welding the first five posts in place by just after 3:00 pm.  It was satisfying to see both Tony and Hector lean on the posts and see little, if any, sway.  When the wooden 2×2 top rail is in place the railing system will be solid.  Rock solid.

After completing the first five posts, we moved to the corner post at the top of the stairs.  This is a complex post as it is offset and has very fine tolerances so the cable will be in the correct location for going down the stairs. We had some grinding to do and then we ran out of time.

Laying out the posts, still in their protective foam wrapping.

Laying out the posts, still in their protective foam wrapping.

Welding the supports for the temporary string line in place.

Welding the supports for the temporary string line in place.

Temporary stringline and first post in place.

Temporary stringline and first post in place.

Post 25 in place.  Note the bracket that will be embedded in the wooded top rail.

Post 25 in place. Note the bracket that will be embedded in the wooded top rail.

Post 10 solidly in place.  Note the 3/4 inch space between the bridge and the post, which is where the madrone hardwood will go.

Post 10 solidly in place. Note the 3/4 inch space between the bridge and the post, which is where the madrone hardwood will go.

Post 9.  This is an 'intermediate post' and used to ensure the cables are not stretched to allow a 4 inch sphere to pass between them.

Post 9. This is an 'intermediate post' and used to ensure the cables are not stretched to allow a 4 inch sphere to pass between them.

Post 8, another intermediate post.

Post 8, another intermediate post.

 

Post 7, which is the corner post by the Bridge Hall.  This is the bridge with the glass decking that leads to the Master Suite.

Post 7, which is the corner post by the Bridge Hall. This is the bridge with the glass decking that leads to the Master Suite.

Installing Our Stairs and Bridges

Monday, September 21st, 2009

Today was a big day for us.  A very big day.

The team from Larson Steel (Hector, ’Little Hector’ and ‘Little Pete’) was fabulous.  They worked well with Ben, our crane operator from West Coast Crane.

Background on the Stairs and Bridges

With our atrium going through to the lower level, our bridges and stairs will be a big part of our house.  The railings will be critical as visitors will touch and feel them.

There are very few interior bridges in residential houses, so our two interior bridges will differentiate our house from many others.  Oh, we have an exterior bridge, too.

Preparing the Site

Bryan arrived at the job site at 7:25 am this morning.  It was a bit foggy.  Our crane was waiting patiently on Winchester Boulevard.  Ben, the operator, wasn’t going to move the crane into position until 8:00 am because of the loud ‘beeping’ noise it makes when backing up.

Bryan, with help from the Larson Steel team, removed the temporary safety railings.

Arriving at the job site.  Note the fog - it will be a very hot day today.

Arriving at the job site. Note the fog - it will be a very hot day today.

Crane parked and waiting patiently on Winchester Boulevard, ready to start working at 8:00 am.

Crane parked and waiting patiently on Winchester Boulevard, ready to start working at 8:00 am.

Bryan has to remove these temporary safety railings.

Bryan has to remove these temporary safety railings.

And, remove these temporary safety railings around the atrium.

And, remove these temporary safety railings around the atrium.

Temporary safety railings are gone and the crane is getting set up.  Still a bit of fog to burn off.

Temporary safety railings are gone and the crane is getting set up. Still a bit of fog to burn off.

Installing the Stairs

We knew it was going to be a tight fit to put the stairs in place.  We had 1/4 inch of clearance with the feature concrete wall.  We rigged the stairs four different ways before finding the correct combination to bring it in.  Essentially, we ended up bringing the stairs in low, then raised it up and pushed it back.

Stairs being lifted from the Larson Steel truck.

Stairs being lifted from the Larson Steel truck.

Here come the stairs!

Here come the stairs!

Bringing the stairs in low, then raising the stairs.

Bringing the stairs in low, then raising the stairs.

The stairs are in place!

The stairs are in place!

With the stairs in place, Bryan scurried up them and helped Hector with the final adjustments.

With the stairs in place, Bryan scurried up them and helped Hector with the final adjustments.

We're done.

We're done.

Placing the Bridges

The two bridges were put in place in minutes.  Literally. 

They fit perfectly and there were no issues. 

Here comes the first bridge.

Here comes the first bridge.

Little Hector and Pete positioning the first bridge (Bridge Foyer).

Little Hector and Pete positioning the first bridge (Bridge Foyer).

Testing the bridge.  Yes, it is solid.  Rock solid.

Testing the bridge. Yes, it is solid. Rock solid.

Second bridge coming from the truck.

Second bridge coming from the truck.

The second bridge being lowered into position (Bridge Hall).

The second bridge being lowered into position (Bridge Hall).

Placing the Bridge Hall exactly where it needs to be.

Placing the Bridge Hall exactly where it needs to be.

Our stairs and bridges are now in place.

Our stairs and bridges are now in place.

Done.  The crane completed its work by 9:41 and left the job site at10:00 am.

Installing the Steel Column

We installed the HSS 4×4 x 3/8″ steel column as well today.  It went in relatively fast and needed to be welded to the W6x16 steel I-beam.

Welding the steel column to the steel beam.

Welding the steel column to the steel beam.

Threaded bars welded to I-beam for the Hardy Frames.

Threaded bars welded to I-beam for the Hardy Frames.

Our Flag is Flying Again!

Our flag is now flying - we're ready to host visitors!

Our flag is now flying - we're ready to host visitors now!

Checking in with Steve Kreck at Paramount Modular Cable Railing Systems

Bryan has been working with Steve Kreck at Paramount Modular Cable Railing Systems on the design of our railing system around the atrium and on the stairs.  Steve is great to work with and has a keen eye for detail. 

Having installed the stairs, Steve wanted to know if we had sufficient clearance for the 1×2 inch stainless steel posts on the stairs.  Bryan measured the gap and it will be close.  We’ll have to ensure the concrete doesn’t extend over the steel I-beam by the stairs or there certainly won’t be sufficient room for the posts.

There is a one-inch gap between the HSS 2x8 stringer and the W10x12 steel I-beam.  Just enough for the stair posts.

There is a one-inch gap between the HSS 2x8 stringer and the W10x12 steel I-beam. Just enough for the stair posts.

You can see there is just 1/8th of an inch of clearance between the concrete wall and the stairs.  Exactly as designed.

You can see there is just 1/8th of an inch of clearance between the concrete wall and the stairs. Exactly as designed.

You can see the Titen bolts that hold the stairs to the concrete wall so there won't be any sway in the stairs.  These bolts will be hidden behind the risers so they won't be visible.

You can see the Titen bolts that hold the stairs to the concrete wall so there won't be any sway in the stairs. These bolts will be hidden behind the risers.

The same Titen bolts hold the landing to the concrete wall.  It is solid.  Rock solid.

The same Titen bolts hold the landing to the concrete wall. It is solid. Rock solid.

You can see how the HSS 2x8 stringer on the right becomes a 3/8 inch plate that floats against the concrete wall.  The same steel stringer continues all the way up the stairs on the left side.

You can see how the HSS 2x8 stringer on the right becomes a 3/8 inch plate that floats against the concrete wall. The same steel stringer continues all the way up the stairs on the left side.

Brittany and Jim O’Brien Inspect the Bridges

Jim and Brittany came by to see our progress.  We had dinner with the O’Briens on Saturday evening so it was great to host their visit.

Jim and Brittany O'Brien arrive at the job site.

Jim and Brittany O'Brien arrive at the job site.

Jim wants the Madrone decking on the bridge before going across.

Jim wants the Madrone decking on the bridge before going across.

Jo-Anne and Kate Test the Stairs

Jo-Anne and Kate inspected the site and tested the stairs.  They approved!

Kate and Jo-Anne arrive at the job site, ready to test the stairs.

Kate and Jo-Anne arrive at the job site, ready to test the stairs.

Taking the first steps ...

Taking their first steps ...

It works!  Jo-Anne and Kate declare the test a success.

It works! Jo-Anne and Kate declare the test a success.